Systems and Cascades in Cognitive Development and Academic Achievement

Authors


  • We thank the families who took part in the ALSPAC; the midwives for their cooperation and help; J. C. Bell, J. Golding, C. Padilla, D. Putnick, and A. Slater; and the UK Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust (Grant 092731) and the University of Bristol for core support for ALSPAC. The ALSPAC Study Team comprises interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, and managers. This research was supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NICHD. Marc H. Bornstein and Chun-Shin Hahn, Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dieter Wolke, Department of Psychology and Health Science Research Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry (UK).

concerning this article should be addressed to Marc H. Bornstein, Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Rockledge 1, Suite 8030, 6705 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7971, Bethesda, MD 20892-7971. Electronic mail may be sent to Marc_H_Bornstein@nih.gov.

Abstract

A large-scale (= 552) controlled multivariate prospective 14-year longitudinal study of a developmental cascade embedded in a developmental system showed that information-processing efficiency in infancy (4 months), general mental development in toddlerhood (18 months), behavior difficulties in early childhood (36 months), psychometric intelligence in middle childhood (8 years), and maternal education either directly or indirectly (or both) contribute to academic achievement in adolescence (14 years).

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