The study uses aggregate and manufacturing sector data for a group of ten OECD countries for the period 1971 to 1995 to estimate a system of two equations implied by a model of R&D-induced growth in steady state. These equations relate R&D intensity to productivity growth and the latter to output growth. The author finds evidence of a positive impact of aggregate R&D intensity on the growth rates of productivity and output. The null hypothesis that growth is not induced by R&D is rejected in favor of the Schumpeterian endogenous growth framework without scale effects. The R&D impact for the aggregate economy is distinctly larger than for the manufacturing sector. Finally, an extension of the empirical model shows that openness has a positive impact on productivity growth.