Economic Development under Climate Change

Authors

  • Channing Arndt,

    1. Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen, København K, Denmark
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  • Paul Chinowsky,

    1. Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, USA
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  • Sherman Robinson,

    1. Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK
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  • Kenneth Strzepek,

    1. Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
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  • Finn Tarp,

    1. UNU-WIDER, Helsinki, Finland
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  • James Thurlow

    Corresponding author
    1. UNU-WIDER, Helsinki, Finland
    • Arndt: Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, building 26, 1353 København K, Denmark. Tel: +45-3-532-3010, Fax: +45-3-532-3000, E-mail: channingarndt@gmail.com. Chinowsky: Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, ECOT 441, UCB 428, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0428, USA. Robinson: Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK. Strzepek: Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, E19-411, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, USA. Tarp and Thurlow: UNU-WIDER, Katajanokanlaituri 6 B, FI-00160 Helsinki, Finland.

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  • This special issue is an initiative of UNU-WIDER's “Development under Climate Change” project. We are grateful for financial contributions to this project by the governments of Finland and Sweden. We also acknowledge core financial support to UNU-WIDER from the governments of Denmark and the UK. The articles in this volume benefitted from discussion, critique, and input from numerous people. For bringing us together and getting us going, we would like to thank Aziz Bouzaher, Jean-Christophe Carret, and Sergio Margulis of the World Bank. Comments by workshop participants at the International Food Policy Research Institute were also valuable. All errors and omissions are the responsibility of the authors.

Abstract

The papers in this special issue represent some of the most comprehensive analyses of the implications of climate change for developing countries undertaken to date. The papers employ a bottoms-up systems approach whereby the implications of climate change are evaluated using structural models of agriculture and infrastructure systems. The authors of the paper hail from multiple disciplines. This comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, structural approach is designed to allow for more robust insight into the potential implications of climate change. The approach also allows for experimentation with alternative policy options for achieving development objectives in the context of climate change.

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