Evaluation of the Norwegian version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-N): Factorial validity across samples

Authors

  • UNNI K. MOKSNES,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway
    2. Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST/NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
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  • GEIR A. ESPNES

    1. Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    2. Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST/NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
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Unni Moksnes, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. E-mail: unni.moksnes@svt.ntnu.no

Abstract

Moksnes, U. K. & Espnes, G. A. (2011). Evaluation of the Norwegian version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-N): Factorial validity across samples. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 52, 601–608.

In spite of the potential significance of stressors, the past decades have yielded only limited and incremental progress in the field of the development of valid and reliable stress inventories for adolescents. The Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-N) was developed to address the domain of stressors specific to adolescent experience. The present study reports an evaluation of factorial validity, as well as the construct validity of the Norwegian version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-N) across two samples, with the use of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Gender and age differences on the ASQ-N sub-dimensions are also evaluated. The CFA supported a seven-factor structure, where all sub-dimensions showed adequate internal consistency. The sub-dimensions were correlated positively with measures of depression and anxiety, and were correlated negatively with self-esteem, supporting the construct validity of the ASQ-N. Significant gender differences in self-reported adolescent stress were found in five of the seven scales, where girls had higher mean scores than boys. The correlation between each stress scale and age was weak, with significant correlations found in four of the seven scales. It is suggested that the ASQ-N is a measure of adolescent stress that is adequate for the research context, as well as for clinical investigation.

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