SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Altman, R. (1996) Waking Up, Fighting Back: The Politics of Breast Cancer. New York: Little, Brown, and Company.
  • Anglin, M.K. (1997) Working from the inside out: implications of breast cancer activism for biomedical policies and practices, Social Science and Medicine, 44, 9, 140315.
  • Armstrong, D. (1993) Public health spaces and the fabrication of identity, Sociology, 27, 3, 393410.
  • Armstrong, D. (1995) The rise of surveillance medicine, Sociology of Health and Illness, 17, 3, 393404.
  • Aronowitz, R. (2001) Do not delay: breast cancer and time, 1900–1970, The Milbank Quarterly, 79, 3, 35586.
  • Bailar III, J.C. (1976) Mammography: a contrary view, Annals of Internal Medicine, 84, 7784.
  • Baker, L.H. (1982) Breast cancer detection demonstration project: five-year summary report, CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 32, 194227.
  • Balshem, M. (1993) Cancer in the Community: Class and Medical Authority. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  • Batt, S. (1994) Patient No More: The Politics of Breast Cancer. Charlottetown: Canada: Gynergy Books.
  • Belkin, L. (1996) How breast cancer became this year's hottest charity, New York Times Magazine, 22 December.
  • Bourdieu, P. (1986) The Forms of Capital. In Richardson, J. (ed.) Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education. New York: Greenwood Press.
  • Brady, J. (1991) (ed) 1 in 3: Women with Cancer Confront an Epidemic. San Francisco: Cleis Press.
  • Brenner, B. (2000) Sister Support: Women Create a Breast Cancer Movement. In Kasper, A.S. and Ferguson, S.J. (eds) Breast Cancer: Society Shapes an Epidemic. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Breslow, L. (1979) A History of Cancer Control in the United States with Emphasis on the Period 1946–1971. Department of Health, Education & Welfare.
  • Brown, P. and Ferguson, F.I.T. (1995) Making a big stink: women's work, women's relationships, and toxic waste activism, Gender and Society, 9, 2, 14572.
  • Brown, P., Zavestoski, S., McCormick, S., Mandelbaum, J. and Luebke, T. (2001) Print media coverage of environmental causation of breast cancer, Sociology of Health and Illness, 23, 6, 74776.
  • Brown, P., Zavestoski, S., McCormick, S., Mayer, B., Morello-Frosch, R. and Gasior, R. (2004) Embodied health movements: uncharted territory in social movement research, Sociology of Health and Illness, 26, 131.
  • Bunton, R. and Burrows, R. (1995) Consumption and health in the ‘epidemiological’ clinic of late modern medicine. In Burrows, R., Nettleton, S. and Bunton, R. (eds) The Sociology of Health Promotion: Critical Analyses of Consumption, Lifestyle and Risk. London: Routledge.
  • Bunton, R. and Petersen, A. (1997) Introduction: Foucault's medicine. In Petersen, A. and Bunton, R. (eds) Foucault: Health and Medicine. London: Routledge.
  • Burawoy, M. (1991) Introduction. In Burawoy, M., Burbon, A., Ferguson, A.A. et al. (eds) Ethnography Unbound: Power and Resistance in the Modern Metropolis. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Burawoy, M. (1998) The extended case method, Sociological Theory, 16, 1, 433.
  • Burrows, R., Nettleton, S. and Bunton, R. (1995) Sociology and health promotion: health, risk and consumption under later modernism. In Burrows, R., Nettleton, S. and Bunton, R. (eds) The Sociology of Health Promotion: Critical Analyses of Consumption, Lifestyle and Risk. London: Routledge.
  • Bury, M. (2001) Illness narratives: fact or fiction? Sociology of Health & Illness, 23, 3, 26385.
  • Butler, S. and Rosenblum, B. (1991) Cancer in Two Voices. San Francisco: Spinsters Book Company.
  • Cartwright, L. (1995) Screening the Body: Tracing Medicine's Visual Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Casamayou, M.H. (2001) The Politics of Breast Cancer. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press.
  • Castel, R. (1991) From Dangerousness to Risk. In Burchell, G., Gordon, C. and Miller, P. (eds) The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2000) State Laws Relating to Breast Cancer: Legislative Summary January 1949 to May 2000. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Clarke, J.N. (1992) Cancer, heat disease and AIDS: what do the media tell us about these diseases? Health Communication, 4, 2, 10520.
  • Collins, P.H. (1999) Learning From the Outsider Within. In Hesse-Biber, S., Gilmartin, C. and Lydenberg, R. (eds) Feminist Approaches to Theory and Methodology. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Connell, R.W. (1987) Gender and Power. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • Crossley, N. (1998) Transforming the mental health field, Sociology of Health and Illness, 20, 4, 45888.
  • Crossley, N. (2003) The Field of Psychiatric Contention in the UK, 1960–2000. Paper presented at workshop, Patient Organized Movements, in Gotenborg, Sweden, 7–9 June.
  • Densham, A. (1997) The Marginalized Uses of Power and Identity: Lesbians’ Participation in Breast Cancer and AIDS Activism. In Cohen, C.J., Jones, K.B. and Tronto, J.C. (eds) Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader. New York: New York University Press.
  • Dickersin, K. and Schnaper, L. (1996) Reinventing Medical Research. In Moss, K.L. (ed) Man-Made Medicine: Women's Health, Public Policy, and Reform. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • Doyal, L. (1995) What Makes Women Sick: Gender and the Political Economy of Health. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
  • Dunnavant, S. (1995) Celebrating Life: African American Women Speak Out About Breast Cancer. Dallas: USFI, Inc.
  • Duster, T. (1989) The structural anecdote in social analysis, Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco.
  • Fernandez, S.M. (1998) Pretty in pink, Mamm: Women, Cancer and Community, June/July.
  • Fernandez, S.M. (1999) Mamm's guide to breast cancer corporate bucks, Mamm: Women, Cancer and Community, 2, December/January, 32.
  • Ferraro, S. (1993) You can't look away anymore: the anguished politics of breast cancer, New York Times Magazine, 15 August, 1993.
  • Ferree, M.M. and Martin, P.Y. (1995) Feminist Organizations: Harvest of the New Women's Movement. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Ferree, M.M. and Roth, S. (1998) Gender, class, and the interaction between social movements: a strike of West Berlin day care workers, Gender and Society, 12, 62648.
  • Fisher, B. (1985) The revolution of breast cancer surgery: science or anecdotation? World Journal of Sugery, 9, 65566.
  • Fisher, B. (1999) From Halsted to prevention and beyond: advances in the management of breast cancer during the twentieth century, European Journal of Cancer, 35, 14, 196373.
  • Fishman, J. (2000) Assessing Breast Cancer: Risk, Science and Environmental Activism in an ‘At Risk’ Community. In Potts, L. (ed) Ideologies of Breast Cancer: Feminist Perspectives. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Fonow, M.M. (1998) Protest engendered: the participation of women steelworkers in the Wheeling-Pittsburgh steel strike of 1985, Gender and Society, 12, 71028.
  • Fosket, J., Lafia, C. and Kanan, A. (2000) Breast Cancer in Popular Women's Magazines from 1913 to 1996. In Ferguson, S.J. and Kasper, A.S. (eds) Breast Cancer: The Social Construction of Illess. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Foucault, M. (1965) Madness and Civilization. London: Tavistock.
  • Foucault, M. (1973) The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Foucault, M. (1978) History of Sexuality, volume 1. New York: Pantheon Books.
  • Foucault, M. (1979) Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Foucault, M. (1980) The Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century. In Gordon, C. (ed) Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972–1977. New York: Pantheon Books.
  • Foucault, M. (1987) Questions of Method: An Interview with Michel Foucault. In Baynes, K., Bohman, J. and McCarty, T. (eds) After Philosophy – End or Transformation? Boston: MIT Press.
  • Frank, A.W. (1995) The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Gamson, J. (1997) Messages of exclusion: gender, movements, and symbolic boundaries, Gender and Society, 11, 17899.
  • Gardner, K.E. (1999) By women, for women, with women: a history of female cancer awareness efforts, 1913–1970s. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of History: University of Cincinnati.
  • Goldman, D. (1997) Illness as Metaphor, AdWeek, 3 November, 70.
  • Hawkins, A. (1993) Reconstructing Illness: Studies in Pathography. West Lafayette, IN: Purtue University Press.
  • Hess, D.J. (2003) CAM Cancer Therapies in Twentieth-Century North America: The Emergence and Growth of a Social Movement. In Johnston, R.D. (ed) The Politics of Healing: A History of Alternative Therapies in Twentieth-Century North America. New York: Routledge.
  • Hwang, S.L. (1993) Linking products to breast cancer fight helps firms bond with their customers, Wall Street Journal.
  • Joyce, K. (2003) Legitimacy in Contemporary Medicine: The Not-So Difficult Integration of Controversial Technologies. Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta.
  • Kahane, D.H. (ed) (1995) No Less a Woman: Femininity, Sexuality & Breast Cancer. New York: Hunter House Inc.
  • Kasper, A.S. (2000) Barriers and Burdens: Poor Women Face Breast Cancer. In Kasper, A.S. and Ferguson, S.J. (eds) Breast Cancer: Society Shapes an Epidemic. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Kaufert, P.A. (1998) Women, Resistance, and the Breast Cancer Movement. In Lock, M. and Kaufert, P.A. (eds) Pragmatic Women and Body Politics. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • King, S. (2001) An all-consuming cause: breast cancer, corporate philanthropy, and the market for generosity, Social Text, 19, 4, 11543.
  • Klawiter, M. (1999a) Racing for the cure, walking women, and toxic touring: mapping cultures of action within the Bay Area terrain of breast cancer, Social Problems, 46, 1, 10426.
  • Klawiter, M. (1999b) Reshaping the Contours of Breast Cancer: From Private Stigma to Public Actions. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Klawiter, M. (2000) From Private Stigma to Global Assembly: Transforming the Terrain of Breast Cancer. In Burawoy, M., Blum, J., George, S., Gille, Z., Gowan, T., Haney, L., Klawiter, M., Lopez, S., O Riain, S. and Thayer, M. (eds) Global Ethnography: Forces, Connections, and Imagination in a Postmodern World. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
  • Klawiter, M. (2003) Chemicals, Cancer, and Prevention: The Synergy of Synthetic Social Movements. In Casper, M. (ed) Synthetic Planet: Chemical Politics and the Hazards of Modern Life. New York: Routledge.
  • Kleinman, A. (1988) The Illness Narrative: Suffering, Healing and the Human Condition. New York: Basic Books.
  • Kushner, R. (1975) Breast Cancer: A Personal History and an Investigative Report. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  • Kushner, R. (1977a) The Politics of Breast Cancer. In Dreifus, C. (ed) Seizing Our Bodies: The Politics of Women's Health. New York: Vintage.
  • Kushner, R. (1977b) Why Me?: What Every Woman Should Know About Breast Cancer. New York: New American Library.
  • Kushner, R. (1986) Alternatives: New Developments in the War on Breast Cancer (with a new Introduction). New York: Warner Books.
  • Lantz, P.M. and Booth, K.M. (1998) The social construction of the breast cancer epidemic, Social Science and Medicine, 46, 90718.
  • Lantz, P.M., Weisman, C.S. and Itani, Z. (2003) A disease-specific Medicaid expansion for women: The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000, Women's Health Issues, 13, 7992.
  • Lawton, J. (2003) Lay experiences of health and illness: past research and future agendas, Sociology of Health and Illness, 25, Silver Anniversary Issue, 2340.
  • Leopold, E. (1999) A Darker Ribbon: Breast Cancer, Women, and Their Doctors in the Twentieth Century. Boston, Massachusetts: Beacon Press.
  • Lerner, B.H. (2000) Inventing a Curable Disease: Historical Perspectives on Breast Cancer. In Ferguson, S.J. and Kasper, A.S. (eds) Breast Cancer: The Social Construction of Illness. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Lerner, B.H. (2001) The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
  • Linden, R.R. (1998) Writing the breast: screening mammography's contested history, 1976–1997, Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, CA.
  • Lorber, J. (1997) Gender and the Social Construction of Illness. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Lorber, J. (1994) Paradoxes of Gender. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Lorde, A. (1980) The Cancer Journals. San Francisco: Aunt Lute books.
  • Love, S.M. with Lindsey, K. (1995) Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book (2nd edition). New York: Addison Wesley.
  • Lupton, D. (1995) The Imperative of Health: Public Health and the Regulated Body. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
  • Marino, C. and Gerlach, K.K. (1999) An analysis of breast cancer coverage in selected women's magazines, 1987–1995, American Journal of Health Promotion, 13, 3, 16370.
  • Markle, G.E., Petersen, J.C. and Wagenfeld, M.O. (1978) Notes from the cancer underground: participation in the Laetrile Movement, Social Science and Medicine, 12, 317.
  • Mathews, H.F., Lannin, D.R. and Mitchell, J.P. (1994) Coming to terms with advanced breast cancer: black women's narratives from Eastern North Carolina, Social Science and Medicine, 38, 789800.
  • Mayer, M. (1993) Examining Myself: One Woman's Story of Breast Cancer Treatment and Recovery. Boston: Faber & Faber.
  • McCormick, S., Brown, P. and Zavestoski, S. (2003) The personal is scientific, the scientific is political: the environmental breast cancer movement, Sociological Forum, 18, 4, 54576.
  • Middlebrook, C. (1997) Seeing the Crab. New York: Doubleday.
  • Montini, T. (1996) Gender and emotion in the advocacy of breast cancer informed consent legislation, Gender and Society, 10, 1, 923.
  • Montini, T. (1997) Resist and redirect: physicians respond to breast cancer informed consent legislation, Women and Health, 26, 1, 85105.
  • Montini, T. and Ruzek, S. (1989) Overturning orthodoxy: the emergence of breast cancer treatment policy, Research in the Sociology of Health Care, 8, 332.
  • Montini, T. and Slobin, K. (1991) Tensions between good science and good practice: lagging behind and leapfrogging ahead along the cancer care continuum, Research in the Sociology of Health Care, 9, 12740.
  • Naples, N. (1998) Community Activism and Feminist Politics: Organizing Across Race, Class, and Gender. New York: Routledge.
  • National Institutes of Health (1979) The Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer Management of Local Disease. NIH Consensus Statement Online, 2, 5, 29–30. http://consensus.nih.gov/cons/015/015.intro.htm (last accessed 5 May 2004).
  • Norsigian, J. (1996) The Women's Health Movement in the United States. In Moss, K. (ed) Man-Made Medicine: Women's Health, Public Policy and Reform. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • Olsen, O. and Gotzsche, P.C. (2001) Cochrane Review of screening for breast cancer with mammography, The Lancet, 358, 134042.
  • Orenstein, P. (1997) Breast cancer at 35: a diary of youth and loss, New York Times Magazine, Section 6.
  • Orenstein, S. (2003) The selling of breast cancer: is corporate america's love affair with a disease that kills 40,000 women a year good marketing – or bad medicine’, Busines2.0, February.
  • Patterson, J.T. (1987) The Dread Disease: Cancer and Modern American Culture. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Petersen, A. (1997) Risk, governance and the new public health. In Petersen, A. and Bunton, R. (eds) Foucault, Health and Medicine. New York: Routledge.
  • Petersen, A. and Bunton, R. (1997) Foucault, Health and Medicine. New York: Routledge.
  • Petersen, A. and Lupton, D. (1996) The New Public Health: Health and Self in the Age of Risk. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Pierret, J. (2003) The illness experience: state of knowledge and perspectives for research, Sociology of Health and Illness, 25, Silver Anniversary, 422.
  • Porter, R. (1985) The patient's view: doing history from below, Theory and Society, 14, 17598.
  • Potts, L. (2000) Publishing the Personal: Autobiographical Narratives of Breast Cancer and the Self. In Potts, L. (ed) Ideologies of Breast Cancer: Feminist Perspectives. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Ray, R. (1998) Women's movements and political fields: a comparison of two Indian cities, Social Problems, 45, 1, 2136.
  • Ray, R. (1999) Fields of Protest: Women's Movements in India. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota.
  • Rennie, S. (1977) Mammography: X-rated film, Chrysalis, 5, 2133.
  • Rollin, B. (1976) First You Cry. New York: J.B. Lippincott.
  • Rosenbaum, M.E. and Roos, G.M. (2000) Women's Experiences of Breast Cancer. In Kasper, A.S. and Ferguson, S.J. (eds) Breast Cancer: Society Shapes an Epidemic. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Ross, W.S. (1987) Crusade: The Official History of the American Cancer Society. New York: Arbor House.
  • Ruzek, S.B. (1978) The Women's Health Movement: Feminist Alternatives to Medical Control. New York: Praeger.
  • Ruzek, S.B. and Becker, J. (1999) The women's health movement in the united states: from grass-roots activism to professional agendas, Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (JAMWA), 54, 1, 49.
  • Saywell, C., Herderson, L. and Beattie, L. (2000) Sexualised Illness: the Newsworthy Body in Media Representations of Breast Cancer. In Potts, L. (ed) Ideologies of Breast Cancer: Feminist Perspectives. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Schaffer, E.R. (2000) Breast Cancer and the Evolving Health Care System: Why Health Care Reform Is a Breast Cancer Issue. In Kasper, A.S. and Ferguson, S.J. (eds) Breast Cancer: Society Shapes an Epidemic. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Scott, R.W., Ruef, M., Mendel, P.J. and Caronna, C.A. (2000) Institutional Change and Healthcare Organizations: From Professional Dominance to Managed Care. Chicago: University of Chicago.
  • Sherman, M. (2002) Doubts on mammograms do not affect their use, New York Times, 23rd June (electronic version).
  • Stein, R. (2004) Some fear women lack facts about mammograms, Washington Post, 6th January (electronic version).
  • Skrabanek, P. (1985) False premises and false promises of breast cancer screening, The Lancet, 10 August, 31620.
  • Stocker, M. (1991) Cancer As A Women's Issue: Scratching the Surface. Chicago: Third Side Press.
  • Stocker, M. (1993) Confronting Cancer, Constructing Change: New Perspectives on Women and Cancer. Chicago: Third Side Press.
  • Strax, P., Venet, L. and Shapiro, S. (1973) Value of mammography in reduction of mortality from breast cancer in mass screening, American Journal of Roentgenology, 117, 3, 66889.
  • Swissler, M.A. (2002) The Marketing of Breast Cancer, AlterNet.org 2002 (16th September).
  • Taylor, V. (1999) Gender and social movements: gender processes in women's self-help movements, Gender and Society, 13, 1, 833.
  • Taylor, V. and Van Willigen, M. (1996) Women's self-help and the reconstruction of gender: the postpartum support and breast cancer movements, Mobilization: An International Journal, 1, 2, 12343.
  • Weisman, C.S. (2000) Breast Cancer Policymaking. In Kasper, A.S. and Ferguson, S.J. (eds) Breast Cancer: Society Shapes an Epidemic. New York, NY: St. Martins Press.
  • Winnow, J. (1989) Lesbians working on AIDS: assessing the impact on health care for women, Out/Look, 2 (Summer), 1, 1018.
  • Winnow, J. (1991) Lesbians Evolving Health Care: Cancer and AIDS. In Brady, J. (ed) 1 in 3: Women with Cancer Confront an Epidemic. San Francisco: Cleis Press.
  • Yadlon, S. (1997) Skinny women and good mothers: the rhetoric of risk, control, and culpability in the production of knowledge about breast cancer, Feminist Studies, 23, 3, 64577.
  • Yalom, M. (1997) A History of the Breast. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
  • Young, I.M. (1990) Breasted Experience: The Look and the Feel. In Young, I.M. (ed) Throwing Like A Girl and Other Essays in Feminist Philosophy and Social Theory. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Zavestoski, S., Brown, P. and McCormick, S. (in press) Gendered bodies and disease: environmental breast cancer activists’ challenges to science, the biomedical model, and policy, Science as Culture.