English ancestors: the moral possibilities of popular genealogy

Authors

  • FENELLA CANNELL

    Corresponding author
    1. London School of Economics and Political Science
      Department of Social Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK. f.cannell@lse.ac.uk
    Search for more papers by this author

Department of Social Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK. f.cannell@lse.ac.uk

Abstract

This article considers the meanings of ordinary genealogy for English practitioners in East Anglia, and in the popular BBC television series Who do you think you are? It argues against the view, most forcibly expressed by Segalen, that genealogy is a ‘narcissistic‘ pursuit which compensates for individual or collective deracination in modernity. Contra Schneider, it draws attention to family history as a form of care for the dead, and a moral terrain on which the English living and dead are mutually constituted as relatives. This permits a reconsideration of the analysis of ‘self’ in the anthropology of kinship, and its relation to the categories of religion and secularity.

Résumé

L'article examine les significations de la généalogie ordinaire pour les généalogistes anglais d'East Anglia et dans la populaire émission de la BBC Who do you think you are? (Pour qui vous prenez-vous ?). L'auteure réfute l'idée, exprimée en particulier par Segalen, que la généalogie est une quête « narcissique » compensant le déracinement individuel et collectif dans le monde moderne. À l'opposé de Schneider, elle attire l'attention sur l'histoire familiale en tant que forme d'attention envers les morts et terrain moral sur lequel les vivants et les morts anglais sont constitués mutuellement en tant que parents. Il revisite ainsi l'analyse du « soi » dans l'anthropologie de la parenté et sa mise en relation avec les catégories de la religion et du séculier.

Ancillary