STAGE-TWO SECULARITY AND THE FUTURE OF THEOLOGY-AND-SCIENCE

Authors


  • with Philip Hefner, “Discerning the Voice of Zygon”; Karl E. Peters, “Why Zygon? The Journal's Original Visions”; Solomon H. Katz, “Transcending Irony”; Lea F. Schweitz, “On the Road with Religion-and-Science”; Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, “History and the Future of Science and Religion”; Stephen M. Modell, “The Genetic Recombination of Science and Religion”; John A. Teske, “A Literary Trinity”; Carol Rausch Albright, “James B. Ashbrook and His Holistic World”; James W. Haag, “Blazing a New Trail”; Joan D. Koss-Chioino, “Concerning Diversity and Practicality”; Ann Pederson, “New Directions, New Collaborations”; Gregory R. Peterson, “Stage-Two Secularity”; Willem B. Drees, “Reflecting upon Religion”

Abstract.

Charles Taylor has recently provided an in-depth exploration of secularity, with a central characteristic being the understanding that religious commitment is optional. This essay extends this analysis, considering the possibility that American society may be entering a second stage of secularity, one in which the possibility of religious commitment ceases to be an option at all for many. The possible implications of such a development are considered for the theology-and-science dialogue.

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