HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATIONS AND THE DEMAND FOR LOCAL LAND USE REGULATION

Authors


  • We are grateful to Gabriela Gutierrez at the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy at New York University for superb GIS assistance. We also thank Aaron Love at New York University for providing us with the 1972 USGS land cover data. We acknowledge William Strange and participants in the Furman Center brownbag series for helpful comments and suggestions.

ABSTRACT

Residents pay into Homeowners Associations (HOAs) to exert greater control over service provision, their properties and those of their neighbors. HOAs enforce restrictions governing land use within their boundaries, but theory is ambiguous about their impact on public land use. By combining two novel data sets on Florida HOAs and municipal regulations, we examine how HOAs affect public land use regimes for 232 cities. We find that the prevalence of HOAs is positively associated with a propensity for regulation, as are newer and bigger HOAs. Also, HOAs are positively associated with land use techniques that direct development through incentives, rather than mandates.

Ancillary