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In 38(2) the following errors were published on pages 305, 306, 316, and 317.

Page 305, Footnote 13: The 1958 Gallimard edition adds the phrase, chose habituelle dans cet etat de l'ame, “a common trouble in souls of this sort.”

Page 306, Footnote 14: The 1958 Gallimard edition reads cette conduite, “this condition,” instead of cette fiction.

Page 306, Footnote 15: The 1958 Gallimard edition reads ailleurs, “elsewhere” instead of en Angleterre.

The French text to the above footnotes should have been in italics and should read as:

Page 305, Footnote 13: The 1958 Gallimard edition adds the phrase, chose habituelle dans cet etat de l'ame, “a common trouble in souls of this sort.”

Page 306, Footnote 14: The 1958 Gallimard edition reads cette conduite, “this condition,” instead of cette fiction.

Page 306, Footnote 15: The 1958 Gallimard edition reads ailleurs, “elsewhere” instead of en Angleterre.

Page 306, paragraph two, lines 8 to 9:

Or one reads that Winckelmann was gay, and hence appreciated the homoer otic foundation of Classical culture at a significantly deeper level.

The sentence should read:

Or one reads that Winckelmann was gay, and hence appreciated the homoerotic foundation of Classical culture at a significantly deeper level.

Page 316, paragraph one, last line:

In this, he is very much like most of Winckelmann's absent and epistolary loves.

The sentence should read:

In this, he is very much like most of Winckelmann's absent epistolary loves.

Page 317, last paragraph, lines 10 to 23:

For Winckelmann, religion was in its very essence a matter of—and a meditation on—raw spiritual emotion and unquenchable, passionate desire. It is for this reason that I find his voice and his vision rich with potential for contemporary reflection on the complex relationship between religion and art. For Winckelmann, religion was in its very essence a matter of—and a meditation on—raw spiritual emotion and unquenchable, passionate desire. To put it in more traditional and Platonic terms, inflected now by Winckelmann's Aesthetics, religion is a novel sort of erotics: it is the desire of a finite being for infinity, nothing less. It is for this reason that I find his voice and his vision rich with potential for contemporary reflection on the complex relationship between religion and art. For Winckelmann, Classical Art was the new-old religion, and its curatorial display was a profound work of love.

The sentence should read:

For Winckelmann, religion was in its very essence a matter of—and a meditation on—raw spiritual emotion and unquenchable, passionate desire. To put it in more traditional and Platonic terms, inflected now by Winckelmann's Aesthetics, religion is a novel sort of erotics: it is the desire of a finite being for infinity, nothing less. It is for this reason that I find his voice and his vision rich with potential for contemporary reflection on the complex relationship between religion and art. For Winckelmann, Classical Art was the new-old religion, and its curatorial display was a profound work of love.

We apologize for these errors.

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