THE REASSERTION OF A BLACK/NON-BLACK COLOR LINE: THE RISE IN INTEGRATED NEIGHBORHOODS WITHOUT BLACKS IN NEW YORK CITY, 1970–2010

Authors


Ronald J.O. Flores, Department of Sociology, Connecticut College, 270 Mohegan Ave, New London, CT 06320. E-mail: rflores@conncoll.edu. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of City Planning or the City of New York.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  This research is a descriptive assessment of the growth and stability of racially integrated neighborhoods in New York City from 1970 to 2010. The focus of our analysis is on the inclusion of blacks in these integrated areas given that current scholarship has shown that in other venues, Asians and Hispanics are socially separating themselves from blacks and aligning themselves with whites. The predominant pattern of racial integration in the city, and one that appears to have become more stable over time, combines whites, Asians and, to a lesser extent, Hispanics, but typically excludes blacks. We conclude by placing our findings within the broader literature on the emerging black/non-black color line, where Asians and Hispanics are increasingly aligned with whites while distancing themselves from blacks.

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