SINBAD Neurosemantics: A Theory of Mental Representation

Authors

  • Dan Ryder

    Corresponding author
      *Department of Philosophy and Program in Cognitive Science, Sycamore 026, 1033 East 3rd Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-7005, USA. Email: dan@danryder.com
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  • Many thanks to all the people who provided me with valuable comments and discussion, including Dorit Bar-On, Scott Brockmeier, Ruth Campbell, Mark Changizi, Fred Dretske, Chris Eliasmith, Paco Garzón, Chris Hill, Bill Lycan, Mohan Matthen, Ruth Millikan, Stan Munsat, Ram Neta, Jesse Prinz, Zena Ryder, Tim Schroeder, Marius Usher, an anonymous referee for Mind & Language, and especially Oleg Favorov.

*Department of Philosophy and Program in Cognitive Science, Sycamore 026, 1033 East 3rd Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-7005, USA. Email: dan@danryder.com

Abstract

Abstract:  I present an account of mental representation based upon the ‘SINBAD’ theory of the cerebral cortex. If the SINBAD theory is correct, then networks of pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex are appropriately described as representing, or more specifically, as modelling the world. I propose that SINBAD representation reveals the nature of the kind of mental representation found in human and animal minds, since the cortex is heavily implicated in these kinds of minds. Finally, I show how SINBAD neurosemantics can provide accounts of misrepresentation, equivocal representation, twin cases, and Frege cases.

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