AGRICULTURAL AND NAMA REFORM UNDER DOHA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASIA-PACIFIC ECONOMIES

Authors


* Address for correspondence: Kym Anderson, Development Research Group, The World Bank, Mailstop MC3-303, 1818 H Street NW, Washington DC 20433, USA. Email: kanderson@worldbank.org. Revision of a paper for the University of Hong Kong conference on ‘The Economics of the Doha Round and the WTO’, organized by R.E. Baldwin and K.C. Fung, Hong Kong, 16–17 December 2005. This is a product of the World Bank's DfID-funded project on Agricultural Trade Reform and the Doha Development Agenda. The authors are grateful for helpful comments from conference participants and for funding from the UK's Department for International Development. The views expressed are the authors’ alone and not necessarily those of the World Bank, its executive directors or the countries they represent, nor the funder of the project.

Abstract

Abstract.  This paper provides estimates of the potential gains to the Asia Pacific region from completely freeing merchandise trade globally and from partial liberalizations that might emerge from the Doha Round. Particular attention is given to agriculture, where the majority of the gains would arise. The results suggest that moving to free global merchandise trade would boost real incomes in the Western Pacific proportionately more than in other regions. The Doha partial liberalization scenarios considered would move the world only a small way towards complete free trade, but inreasingly so the more developing countries themselves are willing to open up.

Ancillary