Cognitive function, mood and health-related quality of life in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals commencing HCV treatment

Authors

  • HH Thein,

    1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia,
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    • Hla-Hla Thein is presently affiliated with the Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

  • P Maruff,

    1. Centre for Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, Australia,
    2. CogState Ltd, Melbourne, Vic, Australia,
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  • M Krahn,

    1. Departments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada,
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  • JM Kaldor,

    1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia,
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  • DJ Koorey,

    1. Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia,
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  • BJ Brew,

    1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia,
    2. Department of Neurology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia, and
    3. HIV/Immunology/Infectious Diseases Clinical Services Unit, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • GJ Dore

    1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia,
    2. HIV/Immunology/Infectious Diseases Clinical Services Unit, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • *This work was presented in part at the 5th Australasian Hepatitis C Conference, February 2006, Sydney, Australia; the 17th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine, August 2004, Hobart, Australia (poster); the 4th Australasian Hepatitis C Conference, August 2004, Canberra, Australia; and the XV International AIDS Conference, July 2004, Bangkok, Thailand (poster).

Associate Professor Gregory J. Dore, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Level 2, 376 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst NSW 2010, Australia. Tel: +61-2-9385 0900; fax: +61-2-9385 0876; e-mail: gdore@nchecr.unsw.edu.au

Abstract

Objectives

The aim of the study was to examine cognitive function, mood and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and their interrelationships, among hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals.

Methods

Baseline neuropsychological and HRQOL measures of HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals commencing HCV treatment were examined from a prospective cohort study conducted between April 2003 and August 2005 in Sydney, Australia. Participants' neuropsychological performance and HRQOL were measured using computer-based battery, Trail Making Tests (TMT), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS), the Hepatitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (HQLQ), and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Neuropsychological measures of HCV-infected patient groups were compared with those of two control groups consisting of HIV-monoinfected and uninfected individuals.

Results

Similar cognitive function, mood and HRQOL were found in HCV-monoinfected (n=19) and HIV/HCV-coinfected (n=15) individuals. When compared with the HIV-monoinfected (n=30) and uninfected control (n=30) groups, subtle cognitive impairment in attention was found in the HIV/HCV-coinfected group (P<0.05). Twenty-one percent of the HCV-monoinfected group were classified as having cognitive impairment compared with 10% or less in the other groups. Sociodemographic characteristics, mood, HRQOL and HCV indices did not correlate with cognitive function.

Conclusions

Our findings indicate no statistically significant difference in neuropsychological and HRQOL impairments between HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals with nonadvanced HIV disease and HCV-monoinfected individuals. This lack of significant difference may relate to the relatively small study population.

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