Botulinum toxin in blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia: comparing different botulinum toxin preparations

Authors

  • R. Bhidayasiri,

    1. Division of Neurology, Chulalongkorn University Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand
    2. The Parkinson's and Movement Disorder Institute, Fountain Valley, CA, USA
    3. Department of Neurology, UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • F. Cardoso,

    1. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Setor de Neurologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. D. Truong

    1. The Parkinson's and Movement Disorder Institute, Fountain Valley, CA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

D. D. Truong MD, The Parkinson's and Movement Disorder Institute, 9940 Talbert Ave, Fountain Valley, CA 92708, USA (tel.: +1 714 378 5062; fax: +1 714 378 5061;
e-mail: dtruong@pmdi.org).

Abstract

Amongst all regions of the body, the craniocervical region is the one most frequently affected by dystonia. Whilst blepharospasm – involuntary bilateral eye closure – is produced by spasmodic contractions of the orbicularis oculi muscles, oromandibular dystonia may cause jaw closure with trismus and bruxism, or involuntary jaw opening or deviation, interfering with speaking and chewing. Both forms of dystonia can be effectively treated with botulinum toxin injection. This article summarizes injection techniques in both forms of dystonia and compares doses, potency and efficacy of different commercially available toxins, including Botox®, Dysport®, Xeomin® and Myobloc®/NeuroBloc®.

Ancillary