Is smoking an extra hazard in pregnant MS women? Findings from a population-based registry in Norway

Authors

  • J. Dahl,

    1. Section of Neurology, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen
    2. Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen
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  • K.-M. Myhr,

    1. Section of Neurology, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen
    2. Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen
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  • A. K. Daltveit,

    1. Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen
    2. Medical Birth Registry, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway
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  • R. Skjaerven,

    1. Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen
    2. Medical Birth Registry, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway
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  • N. E. Gilhus

    1. Section of Neurology, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen
    2. Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen
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  • The authors have no commercial affiliations relevant to this study.

Julie Dahl, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway (tel.: +47 55975045; fax: +47 55975164; e-mail: julie.dahl@helse-bergen.no).

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) in women leads to increased risk of operative delivery and reduced birth weight, which are presumably related to the neurological dysfunction in this patient group. Lifestyle factors may also contribute, and we therefore investigated smoking habits and relevant social factors in pregnant MS women. In total, 372 128 births were registered in the compulsory Medical Birth Registry of Norway from December 1, 1998 to October 6, 2005, and of them 250 by MS mothers. The MS births were compared with all the non-MS births. Smoking during pregnancy was not increased in the MS group compared with the non-MS references. From 1998 to 2005 the MS group had a larger reduction in smoking rate during pregnancy than the reference group. The differences in pregnancy and birth outcome between smokers and non-smokers were similar in the MS and the reference group. Those in the smoking MS group had no increase in birth complications, operative interventions or negative birth outcome compared with those in the smoking reference group. Smoking during pregnancy did not explain the birth weight reduction found for newborns of MS mothers.

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