Changes in cerebral blood flow after acetazolamide: an experimental study comparing near-infrared spectroscopy and SPECT

Authors

  • H. W. Schytz,

    1. Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
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  • T. Wienecke,

    1. Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
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  • L. T. Jensen,

    1. Danish Headache Center and Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
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  • J. Selb,

    1. Photon Migration Imaging Laboratory, Athinoula Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA
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  • D. A. Boas,

    1. Photon Migration Imaging Laboratory, Athinoula Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA
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  • M. Ashina

    1. Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
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Henrik Winther Schytz, Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark (tel.: + 45 4323 3066; fax: +45 4323 3970; e-mail: henrikschytz@dadlnet.dk).

Abstract

Background and purpose:  It is important to find a reliable and bedside method, which can estimate the cerebral blood flow (CBF) of patients in clinical settings. Estimation of CBF by calculating a blood flow index (BFI) using continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) and indocyanine green (ICG) as an iv tracer has been proposed to be a feasible and promising method. To validate if the BFI method can detect relative changes in CBF we compared data with the established method 133Xenon single photon emission computer tomography (133Xe-SPECT).

Methods:  Ten healthy subjects were investigated before and after a bolus of acetazolamide. NIRS data were obtained using a multi source detector separation configuration in order to assess a corrected BFI (BFIcorr) value, which attempts to eliminate contamination of skin blood flow.

Results:  Data obtained showed no significant correlation between CBF changes measured by 133Xe-SPECT and BFIcorr (0.133, = 0.732). After acetazolamide, a 49% increase in CBF was detected using the 133Xe-SPECT method, whereas no changes in any ICG variables were observed after acetazolamide.

Conclusion:  The study shows that it is not possible to obtain reliable BFI data, which reflect changes in CBF after acetazolamide infusion, using the CW-NIRS and ICG method.

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