Get access

The cost of headache disorders in Europe: the Eurolight project

Authors


M. Linde, Norwegian National Headache Centre, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Olavs University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway (tel.: +47-725 75318; fax: +47-735 98795; e-mail: mattias.linde@ntnu.no).

Abstract

Background and purpose:  Headache disorders are very common, but their monetary costs in Europe are unknown. We performed the first comprehensive estimation of how economic resources are lost to headache in Europe.

Methods:  From November 2008 to August 2009, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in eight countries representing 55% of the adult EU population. Participation rates varied between 11% and 59%. In total, 8412 questionnaires contributed to this analysis. Using bottom-up methodology, we estimated direct (medications, outpatient health care, hospitalization and investigations) and indirect (work absenteeism and reduced productivity at work) annual per-person costs. Prevalence data, simultaneously collected and, for migraine, also derived from a systematic review, were used to impute national costs.

Results:  Mean per-person annual costs were €1222 for migraine (95% CI 1055–1389; indirect costs 93%), €303 for tension-type headache (TTH, 95% CI 230–376; indirect costs 92%), €3561 for medication-overuse headache (MOH, 95% CI 2487–4635; indirect costs 92%), and €253 for other headaches (95% CI 99–407; indirect costs 82%). In the EU, the total annual cost of headache amongst adults aged 18–65 years was calculated, according to our prevalence estimates, at €173 billion, apportioned to migraine (€111 billion; 64%), TTH (€21 billion; 12%), MOH (€37 billion; 21%) and other headaches (€3 billion; 2%). Using the 15% systematic review prevalence of migraine, calculated costs were somewhat lower (migraine €50 billion, all headache €112 billion annually).

Conclusions:  Headache disorders are prominent health-related drivers of immense economic losses for the EU. This has immediate implications for healthcare policy. Health care for headache can be both improved and cost saving.

Ancillary