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Abstract

Sometime in the twenty years after 1960, the national story disappeared from English state schools. The creation of the first National Curriculum between 1989 and 1994, itself a novelty in English educational history, was seen by many on the right as the opportunity to restore the traditional national story. What actually resulted was a typical British compromise. The reasons for this outcome are explored here in the light of research evidence from the History in Education Project and in the face of renewed public discussion in recent months about the history curriculum in schools, and the impending national curriculum review.