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Aversive Workplace Conditions and Employee Grievance Filing: The Moderating Effects of Gender and Ethnicity

Authors

  • PETER BAMBERGER,

    1. Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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      Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. E-mails: peterb@tx.technion.ac.il; Ela.kohn@gmail.com; inbalns@tx.technion.ac.il. This research was conducted under a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism with additional support from the Smithers Institute of Cornell's School of Industrial and Labor Relations, and the William Davidson Research Fund of the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology. We thank Sam Bacharach, Michal Biron, Bilha Mannheim, and three anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript.

  • ELA KOHN,

    1. Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • INBAL NAHUM-SHANI

    1. Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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Abstract

Studies examining the direct effects of employee demographic differences on grievance filing have yielded mixed results. Moreover, little is known regarding the possible moderating effect that such differences might have on the link between workplace adversity and grievance filing. Using a sample of 866 blue-collar workers drawn from four unions, we examine the potential moderating effects of gender and race/ethnicity. Our findings suggest that while gender and ethnicity are not significantly associated with perceptions of workplace adversity, grievance filing in response to certain forms of adversity is amplified among women (as compared to men) and among African Americans and Hispanics (as compared to whites). The meaning and implications of these findings are discussed.

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