Discipline, representation and dispute resolution—exploring the role of trade unions and employee companions in workplace discipline

Authors

  • Richard Saundry,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire
      Richard Saundry, Reader in International Employment Relations, Institute for Research into Organisations, Work and Employment, Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE; email: rasaundry@uclan.ac.uk; cjones7@uclan.ac.uk; v.antcliff@mmu.ac.uk
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  • Carol Jones,

    1. Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire
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  • Valerie Antcliff

    1. Centre for Enterprise, Manchester Metropolitan University
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  • Richard Saundry is Reader in International Employment Relations, Institute for Research into Organisations, Work and Employment, Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire, Carol Jones is Lecturer in Human Resource Management, Institute for Research into Organisations, Work and Employment, Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire and Valerie Antcliff is Research Associate, Centre for Enterprise, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Richard Saundry, Reader in International Employment Relations, Institute for Research into Organisations, Work and Employment, Lancashire Business School, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE; email: rasaundry@uclan.ac.uk; cjones7@uclan.ac.uk; v.antcliff@mmu.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

This article reports findings that suggest that trade union representation both protects worker interest and also facilitates the informal resolution of disciplinary disputes. However, this is dependent on robust representative structures and high-trust relationships with employers. Conversely, non-union companions were found to have no substantive impact on disciplinary processes and outcomes.

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