Computer-based training: capitalizing on lessons learned

Authors

  • Wendy L. Bedwell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, USA
      Wendy L. Bedwell, Graduate Research Associate, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: wbedwell@ist.ucf.edu. Eduardo Salas, Trustee Chair and Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: esalas@ist.ucf.edu
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  • Eduardo Salas

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, USA
      Wendy L. Bedwell, Graduate Research Associate, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: wbedwell@ist.ucf.edu. Eduardo Salas, Trustee Chair and Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: esalas@ist.ucf.edu
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  • This work was supported by the Navy Personnel Research, Studies and Technology Department and the Bureau of Naval Personnel (Selection & Classification Office) under the auspices of the US Army Research Office Scientific Services Program, administered by Battelle (Delivery Order 0665, Contract No. DAAD19-02-D-0001). The views and opinions contained in this paper are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Department of Navy position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation.

Wendy L. Bedwell, Graduate Research Associate, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: wbedwell@ist.ucf.edu. Eduardo Salas, Trustee Chair and Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Email: esalas@ist.ucf.edu

Abstract

Computer-based training (CBT) is a methodology for providing systematic, structured learning; a useful tool when properly designed. CBT has seen a resurgence given the serious games movement, which is at the forefront of integrating primarily entertainment computer-based games into education and training. This effort represents a multidisciplinary integration and application of lessons learned from human factors, multimedia design, as well as training effectiveness literatures. The authors suggest 10 practical considerations for CBT design and development, designed to challenge traditionally held beliefs about CBT effectiveness based on previous CBT failures of the 1960s/1970s. These practical considerations are critical to the continued evolution of CBT and should be considered during design and development to most effectively capitalize on the advantages that CBT can offer.

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