Get access

Macrodynamics of Black Political Participation in the Post-Civil Rights Era

Authors

  • Fredrick C. Harris,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Rochester
      Fredrick C. Harris (fredrick.harris@rochester.edu) is associate professor of political science and Director of the Center for the Study of African-American Politics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0146.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Valeria Sinclair-Chapman,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Rochester
      Valeria Sinclair-Chapman (vsan@rochester.edu) is assistant professor of political science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0146.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brian D. McKenzie

    Corresponding author
    1. Texas A&M University
      Brian D. McKenzie (mckenzie@polisci.tamu.edu) is assistant professor of political science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4348.
    Search for more papers by this author

Fredrick C. Harris (fredrick.harris@rochester.edu) is associate professor of political science and Director of the Center for the Study of African-American Politics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0146.

Valeria Sinclair-Chapman (vsan@rochester.edu) is assistant professor of political science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0146.

Brian D. McKenzie (mckenzie@polisci.tamu.edu) is assistant professor of political science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4348.

Abstract

Research on black political life has demonstrated both the positive effects of black political empowerment and the negative effects of economic and social distress on black political participation. Using black respondents from the Roper Social and Political Trends data set, we estimate the effects of political, social, and economic factors on aggregate-levels of black civic activity in the time period from 1973 to 1994. We hypothesize that black political activity is stimulated by factors that enhance the political empowerment of black communities and is depressed by downward turns in the social and economic fortunes of black communities. We find that the positive influence of black political empowerment on macrolevels of black civic activity is countered by economic and social factors that swamp the benefits gained from black political success.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary