Get access

Accountability and Local Elections: Rethinking Retrospective Voting

Authors

  • Christopher R. Berry,

    Corresponding author
    1. The University of Chicago
      Christopher R. Berry is assistant professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637. William G. Howell is associate professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • William G. Howell

    Corresponding author
    1. The University of Chicago
      Christopher R. Berry is assistant professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637. William G. Howell is associate professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637.
    Search for more papers by this author

Christopher R. Berry is assistant professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637. William G. Howell is associate professor at the Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637.

Abstract

For too long, research on retrospective voting has fixated on how economic trends affect incumbents' electoral prospects in national and state elections. Hundreds of thousands of elections in the United States occur at the local level and have little to do with unemployment or inflation rates. This paper focuses on the most prevalent: school boards. Specifically, it examines whether voters hold school board members accountable for the performance of their schools. The 2000 elections reveal considerable evidence that voters evaluate school board members on the basis of student learning trends. During the 2002 and 2004 school board elections, however, when media (and by extension public) attention to testing and accountability systems drifted, measures of achievement did not influence incumbents' electoral fortunes. These findings, we suggest, raise important questions about both the scope conditions of retrospective voting models and the information voters rely upon when evaluating incumbents.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary