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Interpersonal Relationships in Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia: A Review of Empirical Evidence

Authors

  • Michele M. Carter,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York
      Address reprint requests and correspondence to Michele M. Carter, Ph.D. Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1535 Western Ave., Albany, NY 12203.
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  • Julia Turovsky,

    1. Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York
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  • David H. Barlow

    1. Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York
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Address reprint requests and correspondence to Michele M. Carter, Ph.D. Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1535 Western Ave., Albany, NY 12203.

Abstract

Recently there has been considerable research exploring the interpersonal relationships of patients diagnosed with panic disorder with agoraphobia. In general, recent empirical investigations support the notion that agoraphobics' interpersonal relationships are problematic and can decrease treatment efficacy. In addition, it appears that involving the partner of the agoraphobic in treatment may be more effective than treating the client alone. However, these conclusions are limited by several methodological and conceptual shortcomings, including narrow and/or biased sample selection, lack of adequate measures, and insufficient use of suitable control groups.

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