• brain imaging techniques;
  • cognitive neuroscience;
  • cognitive therapy;
  • emotion;
  • mood disorders—unipolar;
  • neurobehavioral treatments

[Clin Psychol Sci Prac 18: 305–310, 2011]

An exciting review in this issue (Forgeard et al., 2011) highlights a number of emerging themes in contemporary translational research. A primary challenge for the next generation of researchers reading this work will be how to carry out the grand charges levied by Forgeard et al. on the ground, that is, to lay the foundations for moving the emerging basic science of depression into the Depression Clinic of Tomorrow. Addressing these challenges could suggest changes in the nature of the basic science, and the questions that are being asked, and employed approaches in contemporary depression research. Preconditions for clinical adoption discussed in the review include (a) beginning to hold neuroscience-based measures of features of depression to the same standards held for other depression measures in the clinic, (b) attending to how the proposed methods might actually end up being feasibly imported into the clinic, and (c) what interventions targeted at mechanisms of depression might look like in the next decade.