THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL BELIEF LEVEL ON INOCULATION THEORY AND ITS PROPOSED MECHANISMS

Authors

  • BERT PRYOR,

    1. Bert Pryor (Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1972) is assistant professor of Communication at Florida Technological University, Orlando, Florida 32816.
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  • THOMAS M. STEINFATT

    1. Thomas M. Sreinfatt (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1970) is associate professor of Speech at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122.
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  • This study accepted for publication September 26, 1977.

Abstract

McGuire's inoculation theory employs an analogy to predict the effectiveness of defenses in inducing resistance to persuasion. In discussing this analogy, McGuire states that it is necessary to use beliefs which have not been attacked previously. Many studies have used inoculation theory to predict resistance with beliefs which have been attacked. We argue that McGuire is incorrect in his interpretation of the analogy and discuss an experimental test of different defenses' effectiveness over three belief levels.

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