ATTITUDES TOWARD A COMMUNICATION SYSTEM: A COMPARISON OF ANGLOPHONE AND FRANCOPHONE HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES

Authors

  • HARISH C. JAIN,

    1. Harish C. Jain (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1970) is associate professor of organizational behavior in the Faculty of Business at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4M4.
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  • RABINDRA N. KANUNGO,

    1. Rabindra N. Kanungo (Ph.D., McGill University, 1962) is professor of psychology and management in the Faculty of Management at McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 1G5.
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  • GERALD M. GOLDHABER

    1. Gerald M. Goldhaber (Ph.D., Purdue University, 1970) is associate professor and chairman of the Department of Communication at SUNY-Buffalo, Amherst, N.Y. 14260, and president of McLuhan Goldhaber Williams Inc. This study accepted for publication September 1, 1979.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the hypothesis that the French and English Canadians, due to their unique cultural backgrounds, differ in their perceptions of and satisfaction with the nature of the organizational communication system under which they operate. The study was conducted in a large community general hospital. A total of 977 or 65.9 percent of the employees (of the 1,483 employees asked to complete the questionnaire) responded. The study revealed that Anglophcne employees consistently showed lower levels of satisfaction then the Francophone employees with the various aspects of the communication system that were investigated in this study. It was suggested that consistency of response to communications perhaps stems from the differing cultural values of the two groups of employees. Implications of these results were discussed.

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