THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PSYCHOLOGICAL GENDER ORIENTATION AND COMMUNICATOR STYLE

Authors

  • MARY A. TALLEY,

    1. Mary A. Talley is a doctoral student in communication at Purdue University.
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  • VIRGINIA PECK RICHMOND

    1. Virginia Peck Richmond is associate professor of speech communication at West Virginia University. This study is based on research conducted for Ms. Talley's M. A. thesis which was directed by Dr. Richmond. This study accepted for publication October 24, 1979.
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Abstract

Psychological gender orientation (Bern, 1974) was examined to determine whether this orientation has demonstrable effects on perceived communicator style in an interpersonal context. No such effects were observed, although communication apprehension and shyness were found to predict perceived communicator style. Gender orientation was found to predict self-reported communicator style, but communication apprehension and shyness were found to remove virtually all of that predictive power when entered into the analysis. It is concluded that gender orientation probably should not receive primary attention from researchers in interpersonal communication. The Communicator Style Measure (CSM; Norton, 1978) is examined. It is recommended that interpersonal communication researchers avoid use of the CSM until such time as problems of reliability, response bias, and external validity are overcome.

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