SEX DIFFERENCES IN STORY RECEIPT AND STORY SEQUENCING BEHAVIORS IN DYADIC CONVERSATIONS

Authors

  • MARGARETL. McLAUGHLIN,

    1. Margaret L. McLaughlin (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1972) is associate professor of speech communication at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MICHAEL J. CODY,

    1. Michael J. Cody (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1978) is assistant professor of speech communication at Texas Tech University. Ms. McLaughlin and Mr. Cody are currently visiting associate professor and visiting assistant professor at SUNY-Albany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MARJORIEL. KANE,

    1. Marjorie L. Kane (B.A., Texas Tech University, 1978) is a master's degree candidate in speech communication at Texas Tech University.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • CARL S. ROBEY

    1. Carl S.Robey is an undergraduate student at Texas Tech University.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Recordings of 30-minute dyadic conversations between strangers were coded for the frequency of occurrence of 11 story receipt and eight story sequencing variables, for the duration of all storytellings, and for the frequency of occurrence of story sequences. Analysis of the data indicated that (1) females spent significantly more time than males as the recipients of storytelling; (2) males and females differed significantly on a linear combination of five story receipt variables (displays interest tokens, appreciates, adds or predicts details, withholds sequential talk, and withholds all talk at story's end); (3) there were no significant differences between males and females in the number of sequential stories told; (4) females and males differed significantly on a linear combination of two story sequencing devices, embedded repeat and marked repeat.

Ancillary