CHILDREN'S PERCEPTIONS OF CHANGES IN SIZE OF TELEVISED IMAGES

Authors

  • STEVE R. ACKER,

    1. Stephen R. Acker (M.S., Boston University, 1975) is assistant professor of communication at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822.
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  • ROBERT K. TIEMENS

    1. Robert K. Tiemens (Ph.D., University of Iowa 1962) is professor of communication at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112.
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Abstract

Using a Piagétan perspective, this study investigated the ways in which elementary school children perceive changes in the size of a televised image (in this case, a candy bar). The findings suggest that younger children perceive changes in image size from a medium shot to a close-up as changes in the object itself. Children's responses to changes in the televised image parallel their responses to traditional conservation tasks, but conservation of televised images occurs at a later age. In addition, children appear to use different cognitive skills to interpret how a zoom or a cut transforms the size of a televised image. When a zoom is used, children more readily perceive the object as “growing larger.”

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