INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AMONG EMPLOYEES, MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION STYLE, AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION: REPLICATION AND EXTENSION

Authors

  • VIRGINIA P. RICHMOND,

    1. Virginia P. Richmond (Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1977) is associate professor of speech communication at West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506
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  • JAMES C. MCCROSKEY,

    1. James C. McCroskey (D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1966) and Leonard M. Davis (Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1958) are professors of speech communication at West Virginia University.
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  • LEONARD M. DAVIS

    1. James C. McCroskey (D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1966) and Leonard M. Davis (Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1958) are professors of speech communication at West Virginia University.
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Abstract

Portions of three previous studies relating individual differences in employee satisfaction and one study relating Management Communication Style (MCS) to employee satisfaction were replicated across four organizational contexts. Major findings were supportive of the generalizability of the results observed in the previous studies. The interface of superior-subordinate relations and their impact on employee satisfaction were examined through perceptions of employees with regard to the MCS of upper management and the task behaviors (supervision and administration) of their immediate superiors. Results were supportive of the MCS conceptualization and indicated that MCS of immediate superior and MCS of upper management had their primary impact on different dimensions of employee satisfaction. Perceptions of superiors' task behaviors were found to have different impact on employees satisfaction for different organizational contexts. Variability in employee satisfaction predictable from individual employee differences and that predictable from superior-subordinate interface were found to have little overlap. It is recommended that both the individual differences (trait) and superior-subordinate interface (situational) approaches to the study of communication in organizational contexts be continued since the two generate independent predictions of unique variance.

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