CHANGES IN LANGUAGE BEHAVIOR AS A FUNCTION OF VERACITY

Authors

  • EARL F. DULANEY JR.

    1. Earl Franklin Dulaney, Jr. (Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1981) is assistant professor of Speech Communication at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.
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Abstract

In this experiment 20 subjects were placed in a situation designed to elicit a number of truthful and untruthful statements. Differences in these statements were examined by the SLCA III and LEXIC programs to find variables that discriminate between truth-tellers and liars. The results indicate that when lying, individuals use fewer words, and, as a consequence, fewer unique words with larger type-token ratios and smaller perceptual-cognitive activity measures, use fewer past tense verb forms, and that males tend to use a greater number of indicative mood sentences and fewer subjunctive mood sentences. When used in a discriminant function equation, 14 of the SLCA III and LEXIC variables were able to provide an adequate level of classification for the veracity of the subjects' statements.

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