Relational Control and Interactive Media Choice in Technology-Mediated Communication Situations

Authors

  • JOSEPH M. KAYANY,

    1. Joseph M. Kayany (Ph.D., Florida State University, 1993) is an assistant professor at the Department of Communication, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. EDWARD WOTRING,

    1. C. Edward Wotring (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1971) and Edward J. Forrest (Ph.D., 1981, University of Wisconsin) are associate professors at the Department of Communication, Florida State University, Tallahassee.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • EDWARD J. FORREST

    1. C. Edward Wotring (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1971) and Edward J. Forrest (Ph.D., 1981, University of Wisconsin) are associate professors at the Department of Communication, Florida State University, Tallahassee.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • A previous version of this article was presented at the annual meeting of Broadcast Education Association, Las Vegas, 1994. We wish to thank Howard Giles, John Mayo, Christopher Sullivan, Peter Easton, Gary Heald, and two anonymous reviewers for their invaluable suggestions. We are also grateful to Kay Cranford, Kim Hughes, Shanty Kokkat, and Grade Kayany for their editorial assistance. Correspondence concerning this article may be directed to Joseph M. Kayany, Department of Communication, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008.

Abstract

The study develops a framework to examine the communication goals of interacting partners and how these affect media choice. The study hypothesizes that in communication situations when the relational dimension of communication goals is competitive, relational control would affect media choice. Personal interviews were conducted among a nonrandom sample of 70 persons. The respondents were presented with different communication situations and asked if and why they would select one mode of communication over another. A content analysis of the responses supported the main argument of the study that in situations of relational competitiveness relational control would be a significant factor affecting media choice.

Ancillary