Infantile haemangioma: Part II. Risks, complications and treatment

Authors

  • C. Léauté-Labrèze,

    Corresponding author
      Dr C. Léauté-Labrèze. E-mail: christine.labreze@chu-bordeaux.fr
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  • S. Prey,

    1. Unité de Dermatologie Pédiatrique et Centre de référence des maladies rares de la peau, CHU de Bordeaux, Hôpital Pellegrin-Enfants, and Université de Bordeaux, Biothérapies des maladies génétiques et cancers, Bordeaux, France
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  • K. Ezzedine

    1. Unité de Dermatologie Pédiatrique et Centre de référence des maladies rares de la peau, CHU de Bordeaux, Hôpital Pellegrin-Enfants, and Université de Bordeaux, Biothérapies des maladies génétiques et cancers, Bordeaux, France
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  • Conflict of interest
    None declared.

Dr C. Léauté-Labrèze. E-mail: christine.labreze@chu-bordeaux.fr

Abstract

Because of their spontaneous involution, most infantile haemangiomas (IH) do not require therapeutic intervention. However, in 10 to 15% of cases such as segmental and multifocal IH, locations in the periocular, airway and perineal areas, or complications of ulceration, treatment is necessary. Moreover, the risk of permanent scarring and disfigurement associated with IH, even if involution is complete, has been increasingly recognized as a rationale for treatment. Treatments for IH currently include topical, intralesional, systemic therapies, laser and surgical modalities depending on the clinical scenario. However, clinicians must carefully weigh the risks and benefits for each treatment. Recently, the efficacy of propranolol, a non-cardioselective beta-blocker, was reported and has been revolutionary in the management of IH.

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