Facets of Right-Wing Authoritarianism Mediate the Relationship Between Religious Fundamentalism and Attitudes Toward Arabs and African Americans

Authors


Megan K. Johnson, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97334, Waco, TX 76798-7334. E-mail: MeganJohnson85@gmail.com. Correspondence may also be addressed to Wade C. Rowatt, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97334, Waco, TX 76798-7334. E-mail: Wade_Rowatt@baylor.edu

Abstract

Since the September 11 terrorist attacks, hate crimes against Arabs have increased in the United States. Despite recent increases in anti-Arab attitudes, little psychological research has been conducted to understand this prejudice. Across two studies, we tested a theoretical model of Arab and African-American prejudice. We found the aggression facet of right-wing authoritarianism mediated the relationship between religious fundamentalism (RF) and prejudice toward Arabs and African Americans. Results are interpreted in light of previous research on cognitive rigidity, RF, and prejudice, and implications are made for political leaders conversing about Arab nations and peoples.

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