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Scale Effects in Capital Markets-Based Accounting Research

Authors

  • Mary E. Barth,

    1. The authors are respectively from the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University; and the University of Melbourne, Australia. They appreciate the helpful comments of Philip Brown, Jeffrey Callen, Gerald Feltham, Sanjay Kallapur, Wayne Landsman, Charles Lee, Kin Lo, Shiva Shivakumar, Stephen Taylor, Rex Thompson, workshop participants at the 2008 JBFA Capital Markets Conference, especially Andrew Stark, the discussant, London Business School, London School of Economics, Queensland University of Technology, University of Queensland, and the University of Technology, Sydney Summer Research Symposium and an anonymous referee.
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  • Greg Clinch

    Corresponding author
    1. The authors are respectively from the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University; and the University of Melbourne, Australia. They appreciate the helpful comments of Philip Brown, Jeffrey Callen, Gerald Feltham, Sanjay Kallapur, Wayne Landsman, Charles Lee, Kin Lo, Shiva Shivakumar, Stephen Taylor, Rex Thompson, workshop participants at the 2008 JBFA Capital Markets Conference, especially Andrew Stark, the discussant, London Business School, London School of Economics, Queensland University of Technology, University of Queensland, and the University of Technology, Sydney Summer Research Symposium and an anonymous referee.
    Search for more papers by this author

* Address for correspondence: Mary E. Barth, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
e-mail: mbarth@stanford.edu

Abstract

Abstract:  Based on data simulated using a modified Ohlson (1995) valuation model, we investigate effects on inferences of five potential scale-related effects: multiplicative and additive omitted scale factors, scale-varying coefficients, survivorship, and heteroscedasticity. We find that diagnostics identified in prior research are not successful in detecting or distinguishing these scale effects. Thus, we investigate the effectiveness at mitigating scale effects of six specifications of regressions of equity market value on equity book value and earnings: undeflated, share-deflated, equity book value-deflated, lagged price-deflated, returns, and equity market value-deflated. For each specification, we compare frequency of correct rejection that the coefficients equal zero, coefficient bias and absolute error, and regression explanatory power. We find that share-deflated and undeflated specifications generally perform the best, regardless of the type of scale effect.

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