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The year 2011 was a satisfactory editorial year for CMI. Regarding the composition of the editorial board, several changes were made in order to suit better the evolution observed within the submissions to the journal. Virology is now much reinforced with three experts in virology: Guido Antonelli, Tatjana Avšič-Zupanc, and Laurent Kaiser. A new Associate Editor, Emmanuel Bottieau, from Antwerp in Belgium, was also recently hired to manage submissions in tropical and parasitic diseases, a growing discipline within CMI’s publication scope. The Scientific Committee has also expanded its themes, in order to best assess the various subjects submitted to CMI, and several new experts joined the Scientific Committee (Murat Akova, Carl-Erik Nord and Jesus Rodriguez-Baño for Infectious Diseases, Nick Day and Nick White for Tropical Diseases, Christian Drosten for Virology, and Elizabeth Nagy for Bacteriology). In terms of publications, thematic coverage has consequently evolved (Table 1; Fig. 1). The works that the journal was initially receiving were mostly focused on bacteriology, physiopathology, and resistance to antibiotics. We now also receive significant proportions of manuscripts in clinical virology and in mycology, and we are receiving an increasing number of submissions regarding tropical and travel diseases. Through this evolution, CMI reflects better the fields of action of the ESCMID, which owns the publication.

Table 1.   Evolution of topics covered by CMI between 2010 and 2011 (publication ratios)
 Ratio 2010 (%)Ratio 2011 (%)
Bacteriology42.434.4
Epidemiology14.410.1
Infectious Diseases17.721.2
Mycology10.37.7
Virology15.219.3
Tropical and Parasitic Diseases0.07.4
image

Figure 1.  The evolution of CMI’s thematic coverage between 2010 and 2011.

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The Journal’s Editorial Structure

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

Each print issue of the journal includes a themed section. These are organized by a guest editor, and cover key topics. These consist of three to five invited reviews on the chosen topic, an editorial, and related covers. Table 2 presents all thematic sections published in 2011.

Table 2.   Theme sections published in CMI in 2011
CMI 2011 themed sections
IssueGuest editorTopic
JanuaryN. PetrosilloPulmonary vascular disease and infection
FebruaryJ. M. PawlotskyHepatitis C virus: from discovery to eradication in 40 years?
MarchG. PappasOf mice and men: defining, categorizing and understanding the significance of zoonotic infections
AprilS. CutlerSpirochaetes: past lessons to future directions
MayG. LinaPresent and future automation in bacteriology
JuneM. DrancourtTuberculosis: an unpredictable long-standing human companion still in need of rapid diagnostic tests
JulyP. ParolaNeglected and emerging diseases in sub-Saharan Africa
AugustP. TassiosCorrelation between genetic resistance and clinical effect of antibiotics
SeptemberG. GreubInfection and pregnancy
OctoberP. BastienRecent trends in leishmaniases
NovemberM. PaulControl of malaria
DecemberG. AntonelliViral infections following monoclonal antibodies

These themed sections are also intended to highlight the fields and topics that we wish to publish on. It is thus noticeable that we recently focused on virology, tropical medicine, and parasitology. Three themed sections published in 2011 on tropical diseases, associated with the recruitment of an Associate Editor and three members of the Scientific Committee, should notably point out to the researchers focusing on these areas that we are very open to tropical and travel diseases.

Submissions

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

The proportion of manuscripts submitted as original articles or as research notes (separated from invited reviews and editorials) is permanently increasing. Also, these manuscripts come from a large variety of countries (Table 3); this shows that the journal is sought by many authors in various countries, even though all countries’ acceptance rates are not currently equivalent. As compared with 2010, it is interesting to note that several countries have managed to publish for the first time in CMI, such as Romania, Burkina Faso, and Kuwait (see Table 3, in bold). This clearly indicates the will of the journal to be open to the world, including emerging countries. It is also interesting to note that China and Taiwan are, respectively, the third and the fifth countries to submit to CMI. Some articles can involve cultural and organizational difficulties besides their high scientific quality. This has led several times to the journal making efforts to help articles reach a structure more consistent with the community’s standards.

Table 3.   Submissions and acceptance rates by country in 2011
 Number of submissionsNumber of accepted manuscriptsAcceptance ratio (%)
Spain1302519.23
France982727.55
China8289.76
Italy772025.97
Taiwan6158.20
The Netherlands581831.03
USA52815.38
India41819.51
Germany39923.08
Greece331133.33
UK33721.21
Brazil3013.33
Turkey2913.45
Switzerland27829.63
Portugal22313.64
Japan21419.05
Iran, Islamic Republic of2000.00
Sweden20315.00
Korea, Republic of1800.00
Denmark17635.29
Austria16212.50
Belgium16212.50
Australia13538.46
Poland11218.18
Finland10440.00
Hong Kong10220.00
Israel10220.00
Argentina9222.22
Canada9111.11
Norway8225.00
Thailand8450.00
Egypt700.00
Singapore7114.29
Romania6233.33
Slovenia6116.67
Croatia500.00
Kuwait5120.00
Hungary4125.00
Mexico400.00
Saudi Arabia400.00
Tunisia400.00
Belarus300.00
Ireland300.00
Malaysia300.00
Pakistan300.00
Russian Federation300.00
Czech Republic200.00
Ethiopia200.00
French Guiana2150.00
Iceland22100.00
Latvia200.00
Lebanon200.00
South Africa2150.00
Ukraine200.00
United Arab Emirates2150.00
Bulgaria100.00
Burkina Faso11100.00
Chile100.00
Colombia100.00
Cuba100.00
Kenya100.00
Luxembourg11100.00
Morocco100.00
New Zealand100.00
Peru100.00
Senegal11100.00
Serbia100.00
Sri Lanka100.00
Total1126214 

Online Publications and Backlog Management

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

The number of submitted papers is increasing; therefore, the number of quality papers that we want to publish is also increasing. This led us to rethink the size and shape of the journal. In 2010 and 2011, the number of articles in print increased significantly (Table 4). This happened because there were too many articles waiting to be published (backlog). We thus decided to clear this backlog of articles by provisionally increasing the size of the journal. However, in order to keep both the journal’s volume and the delays before publication reasonable, we have to maintain a backlog of a maximum two issues worth of articles (approximately 50). Therefore, along with a higher rejection rate (Table 5; Fig. 2), the adopted solution was to publish in print the reviews and the original articles only, and to systematically publish only online the research notes and the original articles having a justified oversize (exceeding 2500 words). The online publications have the same citation rates and the same accessibility; therefore, the authors are not penalized. This new policy was implemented from August 2011.

Table 4.   Year-by-year production summary
YearVolume(s)No. of issuesNo. of pagesNo. of articlesAverage number of days from receipt at Wiley-Blackwell to:
Online publicationPrint publication
  1. aPrediction based on current workflow.

  2. bIncrease due to clearance of backlog.

  3. cDetailed in Fig. 4—CMI production workflow 2011.

20121121200228 91a112a
20111121912b349b159c170c
20101121798b319b101217
200911211942008290
200811212002065866
200711212442328088
200611212662428391
Table 5.   Acceptance and rejection rates for original articles and research notes: evolution since 2008
 DecisionedAcceptedAcceptance rate (%)RejectedRejection rate (%)
200882624029.058671.0
200977920826.757173.3
201099523924.075676.0
2011113821418.892481.2
image

Figure 2.  Acceptance and rejection rates for original articles and research notes: evolution since 2008.

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Infection Hot Topics

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

We thought that it was important to appeal for feedback and reactions, from the editorial staff or from guests, on urgent topics that seem particularly interesting, and to publish these quickly. This selection was immediately very successful, as the second most downloaded paper was a very early Infection Hot Topic [1] (Table 6).

Table 6.   Most downloaded articles in 2011
Author(s)Article titleArticle TypeVolumeFull text accessRef.
Falagas and KasiskouMesh-related infections after hernia repair surgeryReview114912[2]
Rolain et al.New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1): towards a new pandemia?Infection Hot Topic164047[1]
Magiorakos et al.Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistanceOriginal Article183954[3]
Hill et al.Toxoplasma gondii: transmission, diagnosis and preventionUpdate83063[4]
Woo et al.Then and now: use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for bacterial identification and discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratoriesReview143008[5]
Leclercq et al.EUCAST expert rules in antimicrobial susceptibility testingReviewEV2803[6]
CunhaThe diagnostic significance of relative bradycardia in infectious diseaseReview62783[7]
MackayReal-time PCR in the microbiology laboratoryReview102283[8]
Deurenberg et al.The molecular evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusReview132189[9]
Poirel and NordmannCarbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: mechanisms and epidemiologyReview121508[10]

The Position of the Journal within International Competition

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

CMI’s position within the international competition is improving. Its impact factor and its Eigenfactor are progressing in the fields of both infectious diseases and clinical microbiology (Fig. 3). According to these two criteria, CMI appears to be within the best journals of infectious diseases and of microbiology. Although these parameters must be interpreted with prudence, these are signs of good health for the journal.

image

Figure 3.  Kinetics of the evolution of CMI impact factor and Eigenfactor over 9 years, indicating the term of office of the past and present CMI Editors-in-Chief.

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Future Evolution and Perspectives

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

For the next 2 years, we want to keep the journal at its current size, in order to assess its real impact in the scientific community. The journal will continue to have a themed section per issue, as well as around ten original articles, on top of which research notes and longer articles will be available online. Also, the journal publishes supplementary issues (Table 7) that reflect congresses organized by the ESCMID (ECCMID), or conferences sponsored by partners; these supplements also enjoy a relatively large number of citations. The supplementary issues have been managed by the Editorial Board since 2010. Table 5 lists the supplementary issues that were published in 2011.

Table 7.   CMI supplementary issues published in 2011
AuthorTopicIssueOnline datePrintSponsorRef.
Mayr et al.Anidulafungin for the treatment of invasive candidiasis17s1 pp. 1–1220 January 2011March 2011Pfizer[11]
Ruiz-Camps et al.Guidelines for the Prevention of Invasive Mould Disease by Filamentous Fungi by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology17s2 pp. 1–248 March 2011April 2011ESCMID[12]
Vernet et al.Laboratory-based diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia: state of the art and unmet needs17s3 pp. 1–134 April 2011May 2011Fondation Mérieux[13]
 Abstracts of the 21st ECCMID/27th ICC, Milan, Italy, 7–10 May 201117s4 pp. S1–S8954 May 2011May 2011ESCMID[14]
Kullberg et al.European expert opinion on the management of invasive candidiasis in adults17s5 pp. 1–1228 August 2011September 2011Pfizer International Operations[15]
Woodhead et al.Guidelines for the management of adult lower respiratory tract infections17s6 pp. E1–E59 (short version) Full and short versions available online26 September 2011November 2011ESCMID[16]
Huovinen et al.Guidelines for management of acute sore throatIn press  ESCMID[17]

The Journal’s Top Cited Articles

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

The top cited papers (Tables 8–10) show that resistance to antibiotics continues to play a key role in the number of citations of the journal. However, other elements are beginning to emerge, and show the expanding audience of CMI. Concurrently, we have observed a significant increase in online usage of the journal. Indeed, the number of full text downloads has reached 615 822 in 2011, compared to 384 900 in 2010 and 260 685 in 2009.

Table 8.   Most cited papers published in 2010
RankAuthorTitleTypeMonthVol (Issue)Times citedRef.
1Miriagou et al.Acquired carbapenemases in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens: detection and surveillance issuesReviewFebruary16(2)52[18]
2Carmeli et al.Controlling the spread of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negatives: therapeutic approach and infection controlReviewFebruary16(2)35[19]
3Allerberger et al.Listeriosis: a resurgent foodborne infectionReviewJanuary16(1)20[20]
4Yang et al.Body site colonization in patients with community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other types of S. aureus skin infectionsOriginal ArticleMay16(5)17[21]
5Wallet et al.Preliminary clinical study using a multiplex real-time PCR test for the detection of bacterial and fungal DNA directly in bloodOriginal ArticleJune16(6)16[22]
6Casalegno et al.Rhinoviruses delayed the circulation of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus in FranceOriginal ArticleApril16(4)13[23]
7Duchamp et al.Pandemic A(H1N1)2009 influenza virus detection by real time RT-PCR: is viral quantification useful?Original ArticleApril16(4)13[24]
8WeeseClostridium difficile in food—innocent bystander or serious threat?ReviewJanuary16(1)12[25]
9Linares et al.Changes in antimicrobial resistance, serotypes and genotypes in Streptococcus pneumoniae over a 30-year periodReviewMay16(5)12[26]
10Doi et al.Extended-spectrum and CMY-type β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in clinical samples and retail meat from Pittsburgh, USA and Seville, SpainOriginal ArticleJanuary16(1)11[27]
Table 9.   Most cited papers published in 2009
RankAuthorTitleTypeMonthVol (Issue)Times citedRef.
1Brown et al.The Panton–Valentine leukocidin vaccine protects mice against lung and skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus USA300Original ArticleFebruary15(2)47[28]
2Westh et al.Multiplex real-time PCR and blood culture for identification of bloodstream pathogens in patients with suspected sepsisOriginal ArticleJune15(6)41[29]
3Crobach et al.European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID): data review and recommendations for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infectionReviewDecember15(12)38[30]
4Kopterides et al.Statins for sepsis: a critical and updated reviewReviewApril15(4)30[31]
5Nagy et al.Species identification of clinical isolates of Bacteroides by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometryOriginal ArticleAugust15(8)30[32]
6GreubParachlamydia acanthamoebae, an emerging agent of pneumoniaReviewJanuary15(1)29[33]
7LeclercqEpidemiological and resistance issues in multidrug-resistant staphylococci and enterococciReviewMarch15(3)25[34]
8Worlitzsch et al.Antibiotic-resistant obligate anaerobes during exacerbations of cystic fibrosis patientsOriginal ArticleMay15(5)25[35]
9De Valk et al.Interlaboratory reproducibility of a microsatellite-based typing assay for Aspergillus fumigatus through the use of allelic ladders: proof of conceptOriginal ArticleFebruary15(2)21[36]
10Lee et al.Enzyme-linked immunospot assay for interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisyOriginal ArticleFebruary15(2)21[37]
Table 10.   Most cited papers published in 2008
RankAuthorTitleTypeMonthVol (Issue)Times citedRef.
1Canton et al.Prevalence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in EuropeOriginal ArticleJanuary14(s1)104[38]
2Rossolini et al.The spread of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamasesOriginal ArticleJanuary14(s1)73[39]
3Wulf et al.Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among veterinarians: an international studyOriginal ArticleJanuary14(1)63[40]
4Rodriguez-Tudela et al.EUCAST Definitive Document EDef 7.1: method for the determination of broth dilution MICs of antifungal agents for fermentative yeastsOriginal ArticleApril14(4)61[41]
5Richardson and Lass-FlorlChanging epidemiology of systemic fungal infectionsReviewMay14(s4)59[42]
6Hawkey et al.Prevalence and clonality of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in AsiaOriginal ArticleJanuary14(s1)58[43]
7Vonberg et al.Infection control measures to limit the spread of Clostridium difficileReviewMay14(s5)53[44]
8Wulf and VossMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in livestock animals—an epidemic waiting to happen?EditorialJune14(6)52[45]
9Woo et al.Then and now: use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for bacterial identification and discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratoriesReviewOctober14(10)46[5]
10BushPrevalence of Staphylococcus aureus carrying Panton–Valentine leukocidin genes among isolates from hospitalized patients in ChinaOriginal ArticleApril14(4)42[46]

Workflow—Evolution Since 2009

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

The current processing time for the treatment of manuscripts has continued to improve since 2009 (Table 11). In 2011, this averaged 20 days; on average 9 days for the immediate rejection, and 31 days for a decision of acceptance, revision or rejection after peer-review, which at present appears reasonable. The average time between final acceptance and the first online publication is 1 week for the version edited by the author, and 12 weeks for the version proofread by the publisher. The article is then published within 4 months in print, for articles for which print publication applies (Fig. 4). The aim remains for the print version to be available within 3–4 months after final acceptance. After an average processing time of 4.6 months between acceptance and final publication over the last 4 years, this objective is currently being achieved.

Table 11.   Evolution of the processing time for the treatment of manuscripts since 2009
Average number of days between submission and decision200920102011
Immediate rejection17119
Decision after peer review (acceptance, revision, rejection)634431
Average processing time402720
image

Figure 4.  CMI production workflow 2011.

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Conclusion

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References

The ambition of CMI is to reflect the academic activities of the ESCMID, and more generally of the world of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology, as well as to attract the best publications and reviews within the field. The number of submissions is increasing significantly, as is their quality, and one notable fact is the emergence of several countries contributing papers of high scientific quality. The aim is to provide a both fast and fair peer-review process in order to quickly spread the research results of the scientific community.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. The Journal’s Editorial Structure
  3. Submissions
  4. Online Publications and Backlog Management
  5. Infection Hot Topics
  6. The Position of the Journal within International Competition
  7. Future Evolution and Perspectives
  8. The Journal’s Top Cited Articles
  9. Workflow—Evolution Since 2009
  10. Conclusion
  11. References