The domain Archaea in human mucosal surfaces

Authors

  • F. Matarazzo,

    1.  Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP
    2.  Department of Dentistry, Centre of Health Science, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR
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  • A. C Ribeiro,

    1.  Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP
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  • M. Faveri,

    1.  Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP
    2.  Dental Research Division, Department of Periodontology, University of Guarulhos, Guarulhos, SP
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  • C. Taddei,

    1.  School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP
    2.  Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
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  • M. B. Martinez,

    1.  Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
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  • M. P. A. Mayer

    1.  Department of Dentistry, Centre of Health Science, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR
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Corresponding author: M. P. A. Mayer, Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Av. Lineu Prestes, 1374, São Paulo, SP 05508-900, Brazil
E-mail: mpamayer@icb.usp.br

Abstract

Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 834–840

Abstract

Archaea present distinct features from bacteria and eukaryotes, and thus constitute one of the branches of the phylogenetic tree of life. Members of this domain colonize distinct niches in the human body, arranged in complex communities, especially in the intestines and the oral cavity. The diversity of archaea within these niches is limited to a few phylotypes, constituted in particular by methane-producing archaeal organisms. Although they are possibly symbionts, methanogens may play a role in the establishment of mucosal diseases by favouring the growth of certain bacterial groups.

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