Comparison of the DSM-IV combined and inattentive types of ADHD in a school-based sample of Latino/Hispanic children

Authors

  • José J. Bauermeister,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • Maribel Matos,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • Graciela Reina,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • Carmen C. Salas,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • José V. Martínez,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • Eduardo Cumba,

    1. Department of Psychology, University Center for Psychological Services and Research, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR
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  • Russell A. Barkley

    1. College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
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José J. Bauermeister, Las Caobas # 177 Street, San Juan, P.R. 00927, Puerto Rico; Tel.: 787-763-1946; Fax: 787-758-4561; Email: jjbauer@prtc.net

Abstract

Background:  The aim of this investigation was to examine the construct validity and distinctiveness of the inattentive type (IT) and combined type (CT) of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in a Latino/Hispanic sample.

Method:  A comprehensive assessment was conducted with a clinically diagnosed school-based sample of 98 children aged 6 to 11 (CT = 44; IT = 25; control group = 29).

Results:  Both ADHD groups were impaired on academic achievement measures, presented more ADHD-type behaviors during math and vigilance tasks, and exhibited greater internalizing symptoms. The IT group had a later onset of inattention symptoms, presented more sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms, was less prone to initiate social interactions or to be assertive and more self-controlled in social interchanges, was less likely to have externalizing behaviors, had mothers who reported less child-related family stress, and was less impaired in their adaptive functioning.

Conclusions:  Findings supported the construct validity of ADHD in this culturally different sample and suggested that the CT and IT represent distinct disorders.

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