THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE SUBDERMAL GLANDS OF HIPPOPOTAMUS AMPHIBIUS

Authors


Abstract

The subdermal glands of Hippopotamus amphibius are scattered over almost the entire skin surface, but are most frequent over the dorsal and flank skin. They are situated in the plane between the dermis and the subcutaneous tissue. They are from 2–5 cm. to 0–5 cm. in diameter, lenticular in form, and usually possess two secretory ducts.

Histologically, they are compound tubulo-acinar glands. The acini are composed of varying proportions of mucous cells and granular serous cells. The tubular system of secretory cells opens into a collecting system of larger ducts, which in turn open into the main secretory duct, which spirals through the thick collagenous dermis to end at a punctum on the epidermal surface.

The communications of Tomes (1850) and Crisp (1867) to the Society are quoted, and the relationship between the observable phases of secretion and the various types of secretory cell is described.

Summary

The subdermal glands of Hippopotamus amphibius are numerous, lenticular, discrete organs. Microscopic examination shows them to be compound tubulo-acinar glands, the secretory cells of which are of three different types, cuboidal eccrine, serous granular and mucous gland cells. The cytological characteristics of these cells suggest that they are related to the three phases of active secretion from the subdermal glands.

Ancillary