USE OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL ROOTS, INTRARADICAL VESICLES AND EXTRARADICAL VESICLES AS INOCULUM

Authors

  • BRENDA BIERMANN,

    1. Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
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    • Native Plants, 360 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108, USA.

  • R. G. LINDERMAN

    1. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Horticultural Crops Research Laboratory, Corvallis, Oregon 97330, USA
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  • Contribution of the Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University, Technical Paper No. 6596 of the latter.

Summary

The presence of intraradical vesicles increases the inoculum potential of excised mycorrhizas. High infectivity was obtained with root pieces colonized by species of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi that formed intraradical vesicles (i.e. Glomus fasciculatum, Glomus mosseae and Acaulospora spinosa). Root pieces colonized by mycorrhizal fungi which generally do not form intraradical vesicles (i.e. Gigaspora margarita and Gigaspora gigantea) were not infective. Extraradical vesicles of Gigaspora margarita were also not infective propagules. Intraradical vesicles separated from the colonized roots remained highly infective but hyphae and cell debris from the same roots were not. Mycorrhizal fungi in root pieces treated for short times in sodium hypochlorite were apparently killed.

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