Changes in the light sensitivity of buried Polygonum aviculare seeds in relation to cold-induced dormancy loss: development of a predictive model

Authors

  • Diego Batlla,

    Corresponding author
    1. IFEVA/Cátedra de Cerealicultura, CONICET/Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. San Martín 4453, C1417DSE Buenos Aires, Argentina
      Author for correspondence:Diego Batlla Tel: +54 11 4524 8039 ext. 44 Fax: +54 11 4524 8039 ext. 33 E-mail: batlla@agro.uba.ar
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  • Roberto Luis Benech-Arnold

    1. IFEVA/Cátedra de Cerealicultura, CONICET/Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. San Martín 4453, C1417DSE Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Author for correspondence:Diego Batlla Tel: +54 11 4524 8039 ext. 44 Fax: +54 11 4524 8039 ext. 33 E-mail: batlla@agro.uba.ar

Summary

  • • The effect of cold (stratification) temperature on changes in the sensitivity of Polygonum aviculare seeds to light was investigated.
  • • Seeds buried in pots were stored under stratification temperatures (1.6, 7 and 12°C) for 137 d. Seeds exhumed at regular intervals during storage were exposed to different light treatments. Germination responses obtained for seeds exposed to different light treatments and stratification temperatures were used to develop a model to predict the sensitivity of buried seeds to light.
  • • Seed sensitivity to light increased as dormancy loss progressed, showing the successive acquisition of low-fluence responses (LFR), very low-fluence responses (VLFR), and the loss of the light requirement for germination for a fraction of the seed population. These changes were inversely correlated to stratification temperature, allowing the use of a thermal time index to relate observed changes in seed light sensitivity to stratification temperature.
  • • The rate of increase in sensitivity of P. aviculare seeds to light during stratification is inversely correlated to soil temperature, and these changes in light sensitivity could be predicted in relation to temperature using thermal-time models.

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