Role of hydrogen peroxide during the interaction between the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Septoria tritici and wheat

Authors

  • Nandini P. Shetty,

    1. University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark;
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  • Rahim Mehrabi,

    1. Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Centre, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Henrik Lütken,

    1. University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark;
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  • Anna Haldrup,

    1. University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark;
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  • Gert H. J. Kema,

    1. Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Centre, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • David B. Collinge,

    1. University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark;
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  • Hans Jørgen Lyngs Jørgensen

    1. University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark;
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Author for correspondence: N. P. Shetty Tel: +45 35 28 23 23 Fax: +45 35 28 33 10 Email: nps@life.ku.dk

Summary

  • • Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is reported to inhibit biotrophic but benefit necrotrophic pathogens. Infection by necrotrophs can result in a massive accumulation of H2O2 in hosts. Little is known of how pathogens with both growth types are affected (hemibiotrophs). The hemibiotroph, Septoria tritici, infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum) is inhibited by H2O2 during the biotrophic phase, but a large H2O2 accumulation occurs in the host during reproduction.
  • • Here, we infiltrated catalase, H2O2 or water into wheat during the biotrophic or the necrotrophic phase of S. tritici and studied the effect of infection on host physiology to get an understanding of the survival strategy of the pathogen.
  • • H2O2 removal by catalase at both early and late stages made plants more susceptible, whereas H2O2 made them more resistant. H2O2 is harmful to S. tritici throughout its life cycle, but it can be tolerated.
  • • The late accumulation of H2O2 is unlikely to result from down-regulation of photosynthesis, but probably originates from damage to the peroxisomes during the general tissue collapse, which is accompanied by release of soluble sugars in a susceptible cultivar.

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