SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Abrams MD. 1996. Distribution, historical development and ecophysiological attributes of oak species in the eastern United States. Annales des Sciences Forestières 53: 487512.
  • Adams DC, Jackson JF. 1995. Estimating the allometry of tree bark. American Midland Naturalist 134: 99106.
  • Baas P. 1983. Ecological patterns in xylem anatomy. In: Givnish TJ, ed. On the economy of plant form and function. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 420.
  • Baas P, Werker H, Fahn A. 1983. Some ecological trends in vessel characters. IAWA Bulletin 4: 141159.
  • Carlquist S. 1975. Ecological strategies of xylem evolution. Berkeley, CA, USA: University of California Press.
  • Cavender-Bares J, Ackerly DD, Baum A, Bazzaz FA. 2004b. Phylogenetic overdispersion in Floridian oak communities. American Naturalist 163: 823843.
  • Cavender-Bares J, Holbrook NM. 2001. Hydraulic properties and freezing-induced cavitation in sympatric evergreen and deciduous oaks with contrasting habitats. Plant, Cell & Environment 24: 12431256.
  • Cavender-Bares J, Keen A, Miles, B. 2006. Phylogenetic structure of Floridian plant communities depends on taxonomic and spatial scale. Ecology 87: 109122.
  • Cavender-Bares J, Kitajima K, Bazzaz FA. 2004a. Multiple trait associations in relation to habitat differentiation among 17 Florida oak species. Ecological Monographs 74: 635662.
  • Core HA, Cote WA, Day AC. 1979. Wood: structure and identification . Syracuse Wood Science Series No. 6. Syracuse, NY, USA: Syracuse University Press.
  • Ellmore GS, Zanne AE, Orians CM. 2006. Comparative sectoriality in temperate hardwoods: hydraulics and stem anatomy. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 150: 6171.
  • Felsenstein J. 1985. Phylogenies and the comparative method. American Naturalist 125: 115.
  • Godfrey RK. 1988. Trees, shrubs, and woody vines of northern Florida and adjacent Georgia and Alabama. Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press.
  • Grafen A. 1989. The phylogenetic regression. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 326: 119157.
  • Greenberg C, Simons R. 1999. Age, composition, and structure of old-growth oak sites in the Florida high pine landscape: implications for ecosystem management and restoration. Natural Areas Journal 19: 3040.
  • Guariguata MR, Gilbert GS. 1996. Interspecific variation in rates of bark wound closure in a Panamanian lowland forest. Biotropica 28: 2330.
  • Guerin DN. 1993. Oak dome clonal structure and fire ecology in a Florida longleaf pine dominated community. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 120: 107114.
  • Harlow WM. 1970. Inside wood: masterpiece of nature. Washington, DC, USA: The American Forestry Association.
  • Hollis CA, Smith JE, Fisher RF. 1982. Allelopathic effects of common understory species on germination and growth of southern pines. Forest Science 28: 509515.
  • Junikka L. 1994. Survey of English macroscopic bark terminology. IAWA Bulletin 15: 345.
  • Kalisz PJ, Stone EL. 1984. The longleaf pine islands of the Ocala National Forest, Florida – a soil study. Ecology 65: 17431754.
  • Kurz H, Godfrey RK. 1962. Trees of Northern Florida. Gainesville, FL, USA: University Press of Florida.
  • Leben C. 1985. Wound occlusion and discoloration columns in red maple. New Phytologist 99: 485490.
  • Manos PS, Doyle JJ, Nixon KC. 1999. Phylogeny, biogeography, and processes of molecular differentiation in Quercus subgenus Quercus (Fagaceae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 12: 333349.
  • Manos PS, Stanford AM. 2001. The historical biogeography of Fagaceae: tracking the tertiary history of temperate and subtropical forests of the northern hemisphere. International Journal of Plant Sciences 162: S77S93.
  • van Mantgem P, Schwartz M. 2003. Bark heat resistance of small trees in Californian mixed conifer forests: testing some model assumptions. Forest Ecology and Management 178: 341352.
  • Menges ES, Hawkes CV. 1998. Interactive effects of fire and microhabitat on plants of Florida scrub. Ecological Applications 8: 935946.
  • Menges ES, Root RB. 2004. The life of a fire-adapted Florida goldenrod Solidago odora var. chapmanii. American Midland Naturalist 151: 6578.
  • Minore D, Weatherly HG. 1994. Effects of partial bark removal on the growth of Pacific yew. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 24: 860862.
  • Monk CD. 1968. Successional and environmental relationships of the forest vegetation of North Central Florida. American Midland Naturalist 79: 441457.
  • Myers RL. 1990. Scrub and high pine. In: Myers RL, Ewel J, eds. Ecosystems of Florida. Orlando, FL, USA: University of Central Florida Press, 150193.
  • Myers RL, Ewel J, eds. 1990. Ecosystems of Florida. Orlando, Fl: USA: University of Central Florida Press.
  • O’Brien TP, McCully ME. 1981. The study of plant structure. Principal and selected methods. Melbourne, Australia: Termacarphi.
  • Paradis EJ, Claude J. 2002. Analysis of comparative data using generalized estimated equations. Journal of Theoretical Biology 218: 175185.
  • Paradis EJ, Claude J, Strimmer K. 2004. APE: analyses of phylogenetics and evolution in R language. Bioinformatics Application Notes 20: 289290.
  • Pausas JG, Verdu M. 2005. Plant persistence traits in fire-prone ecosystems of the Mediterranean basin: a phylogenetic approach. Oikos 109: 196202.
  • Pearce RB. 1990. Evidence of decay associated xylem suberization in a range of woody species. European Journal of Forest Pathology 20: 275285.
  • Platt WJ, Schwartz MW. 1990. Temperate hardwood forests. In: Myers RL, Ewel J, eds. Ecosystems of Florida. Orlando, FL, USA: University of Central Florida Press, 194229.
  • Posada D, Crandall KA. 1998. Modeltest: testing the model of DNA substitution. Bioinformatics 14: 817818.
  • R Development Core Team. 2005. R: a language and environment for statistical computing. Vienna, Austria: R Foundation for Statistical Computing. http://www.R-project.org (accessed September 2008).
  • Rambaut A. 1996. Se-Al: sequence alignment editor. http://evolve.zoo.ox.ac.uk (accessed September 2008).
  • Romero C, Bolker BM. 2008. Effects of stem anatomical and structural traits on responses to stem damage: an experimental study in the Bolivian Amazon. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 38: 611618.
  • Shigo AL. 1984. Compartmentalization: a conceptual framework for understanding how trees grow and defend themselves. Annual Review of Phytopathology 22: 189214.
  • Smith KT. 1997. Phenolics and compartmentalization in the sapwood of broad-leaved trees. In: Dashek WD, ed. Methods in plant molecular biology. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, 457.
  • Smith KT, Sutherland EK. 1999. Fire-scar formation and compartmentalization in oak. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 29: 166171.
  • Swofford DL. 2001. PAUP. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony (and other methods), Version 4. Sunderland, MA, USA: Sinauer Associates.
  • Terrazas T, Arias S. 2002. Comparative stem anatomy in the subfamily Cactoideae. Botanical Review 68: 444473.
  • Trockenbrodt M. 1990. Survey and discussion of the terminology used in bark anatomy. IAWA Bulletin 11: 141166.
  • Vasiliauskas R, Stenlid J. 1998. Discoloration following bark stripping wounds on Fraxinus excelsior. European Journal of Forest Pathology 28: 383390.
  • Villar-Salvador P, Castro-Diez P, Perez-Rontome C, Montserrat-Marti G. 1997. Stem xylem features in three Quercus (Fagaceae) species along a climatic gradient in NE Spain. Trees 12: 9096.
  • White DA, Kile GA. 1993. Discoloration and decay from artificial wounds in 20 year-old Eucalyptus regnans. European Journal of Forest Pathology 23: 431440.
  • Zimmermann MH, Jeje AA. 1981. Vessel-length distribution in stems of some American woody plants. Canadian Journal of Botany 59: 18821892.