SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Al-Ahmad H, Gressel J. 2006. Mitigation using a tandem construct containing a selectively unfit gene precludes establishment of Brassica napus transgenes in hybrids and backcrosses with weedy Brassica rapa. Plant Biotechnology Journal 4: 2333.
  • Andow DA, Zwahlen C. 2006. Assessing environmental risks of transgenic plants. Ecology Letters 9: 196214.
  • Aono M, Wakiyama S, Nagatsu M, Nakajima N, Tamaoki M, Kubo A, Hikaru S. 2006. Detection of feral transgenic oilseed rape with multiple herbicide resistance in Japan. Environmental Biosafety Research 5: 7787.
  • Burke JM, Rieseberg LH. 2003. Fitness effects of transgenic disease resistance in sunflowers. Science 300: 1250.
  • Campbell LG, Snow AA, Ridley CE. 2006. Weed evolution after crop gene introgression: greater survival and fecundity of hybrids in a new environment. Ecology Letters 11: 11981209.
  • Campbell LG, Snow AA, Sweeney PM, Ketner JM. 2009. Rapid evolution in crop–weed hybrids under artificial selection for divergent life histories. Evolutionary Applications 2: 172186.
  • Cheam AH, Code GR. 1995. The biology of Australian weeds. 24. Raphanus raphanistrum L. Plant Protection Quarterly 10: 213.
  • Conner JK, Tjhio D, Berlocher SH, Rush SL. 1997. Inheritance and linkage relationships of nine allozyme loci in wild radish. The Journal of Heredity 88: 6062.
  • Cousens RD, Warringa JW, Cameron JE, Hoy V. 2001. Early growth and development of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) in relation to wheat. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 52: 755769.
  • Devlin B, Clegg J, Ellstrand NC. 1992. The effect of flower production on male reproductive success in wild radish populations. Evolution 46: 10301042.
  • D’Hertefeldt T, Jørgensen RB, Pettersson LB. 2008. Long-term persistence of GM oilseed rape in the seedbank. Biology Letters 3: 314317.
  • Ellstrand NC. 2003. Dangerous liaisons? When cultivated plants mate with their wild relatives. Baltimore, MD, USA: John Hopkins University Press.
  • Ellstrand NC, Devlin B. 1989. Transmission genetics of isozyme loci in Raphanus sativus (Brassicaceae): stress-dependent non-Mendelian segregation. American Journal of Botany 76: 4046.
  • Fischer DW, Harvey RG, Vangessel MJ, Rabaey TL, Bach DJ. 1999. Response of oat (Avena sativa) varieties and wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) to thifensulfuron plus tribenuron. Weed Technology 13: 144150.
  • Gressel J. 1999. Tandem constructs: preventing the rise of superweeds. Trends in Biotechnology 17: 361366.
  • Hall L, Topinka K, Huffman J, Davis L, Good A. 2000. Pollen flow between herbicide-resistant Brassica napus is the cause of multiple-resistant B. napus volunteers. Weed Science, 48: 688694.
  • Hauser TP, Damgaard C, Jørgensen RB. 2003. Frequency-dependent fitness of hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa (Brassicaceae). American Journal of Botany 90: 571578.
  • Hegde SG, Nason JD, Clegg JM, Ellstrand NC. 2006. The evolution of California’s wild radish has resulted in the extinction of its progenitors. Evolution 60: 11871197.
  • Holm LG, Doll J, Holm E, Pancho J, Herberger J. 1997. World weeds: natural histories and distributions. New York, NY, USA: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Irwin RE, Strauss SY. 2005. Flower color microevolution in wild radish: evolutionary response to pollinator-mediated selection. The American Naturalist 165: 225237.
  • Irwin RE, Strauss SY, Storz S, Emerson A, Guibert G. 2003. The role of herbivores in the maintenance of a flower color polymorphism in wild radish. Ecology 84: 17331743.
  • Jørgensen R., Andersen B. 1994. Spontaneous hybridization between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy Brassica campestris: a risk of growing genetically modified oilseed rape. American Journal of Botany 81: 11691175.
  • Kay QON. 1976. Preferential pollination of yellow-flowered morphs of Raphanus raphanistrum by Pieris and Eristalis spp. Nature 261: 230232.
  • Kercher S, Conner JK. 1996. Patterns of genetic variability within and among populations of wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum (Brassicaceae). American Journal of Botany 83: 14161421.
  • Klinger T, Elam DR, Ellstrand NC. 1991. Radish as a model system for the study of engineered gene escape rates via crop–weed mating. Conservation Biology 5: 531535.
  • Klinger T, Arriola PE, Ellstrand NC. 1992. Crop-weed hybridization in radish (Raphanus sativus L.): effects of distance and population size. American Journal of Botany 79: 14311435.
  • Lee TN, Snow AA. 1998. Pollinator preferences and the persistence of crop genes in wild radish populations (Raphanus raphanistrum, Brassicaceae). American Journal of Botany 85: 333349.
  • Linder CR, Taha I, Seiler GJ, Snow AA, Rieseberg LH. 1998. Long-term introgression of crop genes into wild sunflower populations. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 96: 339347.
  • Lönn M., Prentice HC, Bengtsson K. 1996. Genetic structure, allozyme–habitat associations and reproductive fitness in Gypsophila fastigiata (Caryophyllaceae). Oecologia 106: 308316.
  • Martinez-Castillo J, Zizumbo-Villarreal D, Gepts P, Colunga-Garcia Marin P. 2007. Gene flow and genetic structure in the wild-weedy-domesticated complex of Phaseolus lunatus L. in its Mesoamerican center of domestication and diversity. Crop Science 47: 5866.
  • Mercer KL, Andow DA, Wyse DL, Shaw RG. 2007. Stress and domestication traits increase the relative fitness of crop–wild hybrids in sunflower. Ecology Letter 10: 383393.
  • Morrell PL, Williams-Coplin TD, Lattu AL, Bowers JE, Chandler JM, Paterson AH. 2005. Crop-to-weed introgression has impacted allelic composition of johnsongrass populations with and without recent exposure to cultivated sorghum. Molecular Ecology 14: 21432154.
  • Panetsos CA, Baker HG. 1967. The origin of variation in ‘wild’Raphanus sativus (Cruciferae) in California. Genetica 38: 243274.
  • Papa R, Acosta J, Delgado-Salinas A, Gepts P. 2005. A genome-wide analysis of differentiation between wild and domesticated Phaseolus vulgaris from Mesoamerica. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 11: 11471158.
  • Reichman JR, Watrud LS, Lee EH, Burdick CA, Bollman MA, Storm MJ, King GA, Mallory-Smith C. 2006. Establishment of transgenic herbicide-resistant creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) in nonagronomic habitats. Molecular Ecology 15: 42434255.
  • Ridley CE, Ellstrand NC 2009. Evolution of enhanced reproduction in the hybrid-derived invasive, California wild radish (Raphanus sativus). Biological Invasions 11: 22512264.
  • Sahli HF, Conner JK. 2007. Visitation, effectiveness, and efficiency of 15 genera of visitors to wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum (Brassicaceae). American Journal of Botany 94: 203209.
  • Sahli HF, Conner JK, Shaw FH, Howe S, Lale A. 2008. Adaptive differentiation of quantitative traits in the globally distributed weed, wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum). Genetics 180: 945955.
  • SAS. 2003. Cary, NC, USA: SAS Institute Inc.
  • Snow AA, Campbell LG. 2005. Can feral radishes become weeds? In: GresselJ, ed. Crop ferality and volunteerism. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, 193208.
  • Snow AA, Uthus KL, Culley TM. 2001. Fitness of hybrids between weedy and cultivated radish: implications for weed evolution. Ecological Applications 11: 934943.
  • Snow AA, Pilson D, Rieseberg LH, Paulsen MJ, Pleskac N, Reagon MR, Wolf DE, Selbo SM. 2003. A Bt transgene reduces herbivory and enhances fecundity in wild sunflowers. Ecological Applications 13: 279286.
  • Snow AA, Andow DA, Gepts P, Hallerman EM, Power A, Tiedje JM, Wolfenbarger LL. 2005. Genetically engineered organisms and the environment: current status and recommendations. Ecological Applications 15: 377404.
  • Stace CA. 1975. Hybridization and the flora of the British Isles. London, UK: Academic Press.
  • Stanton ML. 1987. Reproductive biology of petal color variants in wild populations of Raphanus sativus: I. Pollinator response to color morphs. American Journal of Botany 74: 178187.
  • Stanton ML, Snow AA, Handel SN. 1986. Floral evolution: attractiveness to pollinators increases male fitness in a hermaphroditic angiosperm. Science 232: 16251627.
  • Travers SE, Mazer SJ. 2001. Trade-offs between components of male and female reproduction associated with the phosphoglucose isomerase locus in an annual plant. Evolution 55: 24212428.
  • USA National Research Council. 2004. Biological confinement of genetically engineered organisms. Washington, DC, USA: National Academies Press.
  • Warwick SI, Francis A. 2005. The biology of Canadian weeds. 132. Raphanus raphanistrum L. Canadian Journal of Plant Science 85: 709733.
  • Warwick SI, Stewart CN. 2005. Crops come from wild plants – domestication, transgenes, and linkage together shape ferality. In: GresselJ, ed. Crop ferality and volunteerism. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, 930.
  • Warwick SI, Simard M-J, Légère A, Beckie HJ, Braun L, Zhu B et al. 2003. Hybridization between transgenic Brassica napus L. and its wild relatives: B. rapa L., Raphanus raphanistrum L., Sinapis arvensis L. and Erucastrum gallicum (Willd.) O.E. Schulz. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 107: 528539.
  • Warwick SI, Légère A, Simard MJ, James T. 2008. Do escaped transgenes persist in nature? The case of an herbicide resistance transgene in a weedy Brassica rapa population Molecular Ecology 17: 13871395.
  • Watrud LS, Lee EH, Fairbrother A, Burdick CA, Bollman MA, Storm MJ, King G, Van de Water PK. 2004. Evidence for landscape level pollen-mediated gene flow from genetically modified creeping bentgrass using CP4 EPSPS as a marker. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 101: 1453314538.
  • Weaver SE, Ivany JA. 1998. Economic thresholds for wild radish, wild oat, hemp-nettle and corn spurry in spring barley. Canadian Journal of Plant Science 78: 357361.
  • de Wet JMJ, Harlan JR. 1975. Weeds and domesticates: evolution in the manmade habitat. Economic Botany 29: 99107.
  • Whitton J, Wolf DE, Arias DM, Snow AA, Rieseberg LH. 1997. The persistence of cultivar alleles in wild populations of sunflowers five generations after hybridization. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 95: 3340.
  • Zapiola ML, Campbell CK, Butler MD, Mallory-Smith CA. 2008. Escape and establishment of transgenic glyphosate-resistant creeping bentgrass Agrostis stolonifera in Oregon, USA: a 4-year study. The Journal of Applied Ecology 45: 486494.