Does abscisic acid affect strigolactone biosynthesis?

Authors

  • Juan A. López-Ráez,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Soil Microbiology and Symbiotic Systems, Estación Experimental del Zaidín (CSIC), Profesor Albareda 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Wouter Kohlen,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Tatsiana Charnikhova,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Patrick Mulder,

    1. RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Bornsesteeg 45, NL–6708 PD Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Anna K. Undas,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Centre for Biosystems Genomics, PO Box 98, NL–6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Martin J. Sergeant,

    1. Warwick-HRI, Wellesbourne, University of Warwick, Warwickshire, CV35 9EF, UK
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  • Francel Verstappen,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Centre for Biosystems Genomics, PO Box 98, NL–6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Timothy D. H. Bugg,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK
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  • Andrew J. Thompson,

    1. Warwick-HRI, Wellesbourne, University of Warwick, Warwickshire, CV35 9EF, UK
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  • Carolien Ruyter-Spira,

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Harro Bouwmeester

    1. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, NL–6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Centre for Biosystems Genomics, PO Box 98, NL–6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands
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Author for correspondence:
Harro Bouwmeester
Tel: +31 31 7480528
Email: harro.bouwmeester@wur.nl

Summary

  • Strigolactones are considered a novel class of plant hormones that, in addition to their endogenous signalling function, are exuded into the rhizosphere acting as a signal to stimulate hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and germination of root parasitic plant seeds. Considering the importance of the strigolactones and their biosynthetic origin (from carotenoids), we investigated the relationship with the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA).
  • Strigolactone production and ABA content in the presence of specific inhibitors of oxidative carotenoid cleavage enzymes and in several tomato ABA-deficient mutants were analysed by LC-MS/MS. In addition, the expression of two genes involved in strigolactone biosynthesis was studied.
  • The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) inhibitor D2 reduced strigolactone but not ABA content of roots. However, in abamineSG-treated plants, an inhibitor of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), and the ABA mutants notabilis, sitiens and flacca, ABA and strigolactones were greatly reduced. The reduction in strigolactone production correlated with the downregulation of LeCCD7 and LeCCD8 genes in all three mutants.
  • The results show a correlation between ABA levels and strigolactone production, and suggest a role for ABA in the regulation of strigolactone biosynthesis.

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