Genetic diversity of Ectocarpus (Ectocarpales, Phaeophyceae) in Peru and northern Chile, the area of origin of the genome-sequenced strain

Authors

  • Akira F. Peters,

    1. Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth PL1 2PB, UK
    2. Bezhin Rosko, 28 route de Perharidy, 29680 Roscoff, France
    3. UMR7139, Station Biologique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Université Pierre & Marie Curie Paris VI, Place Georges Teissier, 29682 Roscoff Cedex, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Aaron D. Mann,

    1. Departamento de Ecología and Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Alameda 340, Santiago, Chile
    Search for more papers by this author
  • César A. Córdova,

    1. Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Ciudad Universitaria, Lima, Perú
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Juliet Brodie,

    1. Department of Botany, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Juan A. Correa,

    1. Departamento de Ecología and Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Alameda 340, Santiago, Chile
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Declan C. Schroeder,

    1. Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth PL1 2PB, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Mark Cock

    1. UMR7139, Station Biologique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Université Pierre & Marie Curie Paris VI, Place Georges Teissier, 29682 Roscoff Cedex, France
    Search for more papers by this author

Author for correspondence:
Akira F. Peters
Tel: +33 298193080
Email: akirapeters@gmail.com

Summary

  • The origin of the Ectocarpus strain used for genome sequencing (the ‘genome strain’) was Peru, where no Ectocarpus had been reported previously. To study the genetic diversity in the region and to increase the number of individuals from this area available for genetic experiments, 119 new Ectocarpus strains were isolated from eight localities along the 3000 km of coastline from central Peru to central Chile.
  • Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) genotyping revealed nine different genotypes, five of which were endemic to the area studied and three of which were previously unknown.
  • Individuals of the same genotype as the genome strain occurred from Peru to northernmost Chile, representing 61% of the samples in this area, from which five more genotypes were isolated. Further south, down to central Chile, most individuals belonged to Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ectocarpus fasciculatus and Ectocarpus crouaniorum. In sexual crosses, the genome strain and the new isolates of the same genotype were fully compatible.
  • Sequences from four nuclear and cytoplasmic genetic markers (ITS1, ITS2, Rubisco spacer and Cytochrome-c oxidase subunit 3 (cox3)) separated the genome strain from the known species of Ectocarpus. It may in future be recognized as a separate species.

Ancillary