Extensive metabolic cross-talk in melon fruit revealed by spatial and developmental combinatorial metabolomics

Authors

  • Annick Moing,

    1. INRA – UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
    2. Metabolome-Fluxome Facility of Bordeaux Functional Genomics Center, IFR103 BVI, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Asaph Aharoni,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, POB 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Benoit Biais,

    1. INRA – UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Ilana Rogachev,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, POB 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Sagit Meir,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, POB 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Leonid Brodsky,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, POB 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • J. William Allwood,

    1. School of Chemistry, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
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  • Alexander Erban,

    1. MPI Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
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  • Warwick B. Dunn,

    1. School of Chemistry, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
    2. Manchester Centre for Integrative Systems Biology, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
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  • Lorraine Kay,

    1. LECO Instruments UK, Hazel Grove, Manchester SK7 5DA, UK
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  • Sjaak de Koning,

    1. LECO Instruments, Marie-Bernays-Ring 31, 41199 Mönchengladbach, Germany
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  • Ric C. H. de Vos,

    1. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Netherlands Metabolomics Centre, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden, the Netherlands
    3. Centre for BioSystems Genomics, PO Box 98, 6700AB, Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Harry Jonker,

    1. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Centre for BioSystems Genomics, PO Box 98, 6700AB, Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Roland Mumm,

    1. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Centre for BioSystems Genomics, PO Box 98, 6700AB, Wageningen, the Netherlands
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  • Catherine Deborde,

    1. INRA – UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
    2. Metabolome-Fluxome Facility of Bordeaux Functional Genomics Center, IFR103 BVI, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Michael Maucourt,

    1. Metabolome-Fluxome Facility of Bordeaux Functional Genomics Center, IFR103 BVI, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
    2. Université de Bordeaux, UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Stéphane Bernillon,

    1. INRA – UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
    2. Metabolome-Fluxome Facility of Bordeaux Functional Genomics Center, IFR103 BVI, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Yves Gibon,

    1. INRA – UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
    2. Metabolome-Fluxome Facility of Bordeaux Functional Genomics Center, IFR103 BVI, Centre INRA de Bordeaux, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Thomas H. Hansen,

    1. Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Søren Husted,

    1. Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Royston Goodacre,

    1. School of Chemistry, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
    2. Manchester Centre for Integrative Systems Biology, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
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  • Joachim Kopka,

    1. MPI Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
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  • Jan K. Schjoerring,

    1. Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Dominique Rolin,

    1. Université de Bordeaux, UMR 619 Biologie du Fruit, F-33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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  • Robert D. Hall

    1. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
    2. Netherlands Metabolomics Centre, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden, the Netherlands
    3. Centre for BioSystems Genomics, PO Box 98, 6700AB, Wageningen, the Netherlands
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Author for correspondence:
Annick Moing
Tel: +33 5 57 12 25 28
Email: moing@bordeaux.inra.fr

Summary

  • Variations in tissue development and spatial composition have a major impact on the nutritional and organoleptic qualities of ripe fleshy fruit, including melon (Cucumis melo). To gain a deeper insight into the mechanisms involved in these changes, we identified key metabolites for rational food quality design.
  • The metabolome, volatiles and mineral elements were profiled employing an unprecedented range of complementary analytical technologies. Fruits were followed at a number of time points during the final ripening process and tissues were collected across the fruit flesh from rind to seed cavity. Approximately 2000 metabolite signatures and 15 mineral elements were determined in an assessment of temporal and spatial melon fruit development.
  • This study design enabled the identification of: coregulated hubs (including aspartic acid, 2-isopropylmalic acid, β-carotene, phytoene and dihydropseudoionone) in metabolic association networks; global patterns of coordinated compositional changes; and links of primary and secondary metabolism to key mineral and volatile fruit complements.
  • The results reveal the extent of metabolic interactions relevant to ripe fruit quality and thus have enabled the identification of essential candidate metabolites for the high-throughput screening of melon breeding populations for targeted breeding programmes aimed at nutrition and flavour improvement.

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