Models of long-distance transport: how is carrier-dependent auxin transport regulated in the stem?

Authors

  • Michael Renton,

    1. School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    2. CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Floreat, WA 6014, Australia
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  • Jim Hanan,

    1. Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia
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  • Brett J. Ferguson,

    1. Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia
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  • Christine A. Beveridge

    1. School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 203, Issue 2, 705, Article first published online: 27 May 2014

Author for correspondence:
Michael Renton
Tel: +61 8 6488 1959
Email: michael.renton@uwa.edu.au

Summary

  • This paper presents two models of carrier-dependent long-distance auxin transport in stems that represent the process at different scales.
  • A simple compartment model using a single constant auxin transfer rate produced similar data to those observed in biological experiments. The effects of different underlying biological assumptions were tested in a more detailed model representing cellular and intracellular processes that enabled discussion of different patterns of carrier-dependent auxin transport and signalling.
  • The output that best fits the biological data is produced by a model where polar auxin transport is not limited by the number of transporters/carriers and hence supports biological data showing that stems have considerable excess capacity to transport auxin.
  • All results support the conclusion that auxin depletion following apical decapitation in pea (Pisum sativum) occurs too slowly to be the initial cause of bud outgrowth. Consequently, changes in auxin content in the main stem and changes in polar auxin transport/carrier abundance in the main stem are not correlated with axillary bud outgrowth.

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