Multivariate analysis of physiological parameters reveals a consistent O3 response pattern in leaves of adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Authors

  • Markus Löw,

    1. Melbourne School of Land and Environment, Department of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Water Street, Creswick, Victoria 3363, Australia
    2. Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universität München, Von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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  • Gaby Deckmyn,

    1. Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Maarten Op de Beeck,

    1. Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Manuela C. Blumenröther,

    1. Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universität München, Von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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  • Wolfgang Oßwald,

    1. Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universität München, Von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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  • Maria Alexou,

    1. Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert Ludwigs Universität, Georges-Köhler-Allee 053/054, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
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  • Sascha Jehnes,

    1. Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert Ludwigs Universität, Georges-Köhler-Allee 053/054, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
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  • Kristine Haberer,

    1. Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert Ludwigs Universität, Georges-Köhler-Allee 053/054, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
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  • Heinz Rennenberg,

    1. Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert Ludwigs Universität, Georges-Köhler-Allee 053/054, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
    2. King Saud University, PO Box 2454, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
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  • Karin Herbinger,

    1. Institut für Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universität Graz, Schubertstraße 51, 8010 Graz, Austria
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  • Karl-Heinz Häberle,

    1. Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universität München, Von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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  • Günther Bahnweg,

    1. Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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  • David Hanke,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
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  • Gerhard Wieser,

    1. Institut für Naturgefahren und Waldgrenzregionen, Alpine Waldgrenzregionen, Hofburg 1 A-6020, Innsbruck, Austria
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  • Reinhart Ceulemans,

    1. Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Rainer Matyssek,

    1. Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universität München, Von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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  • Michael Tausz

    1. Melbourne School of Land and Environment, Department of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Water Street, Creswick, Victoria 3363, Australia
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Author for correspondence:
Markus Löw
Tel: +61 3 5321 4309
Email: loew@mytum.de

Summary

  • Increasing atmospheric concentrations of phytotoxic ozone (O3) can constrain growth and carbon sink strength of forest trees, potentially exacerbating global radiative forcing. Despite progress in the conceptual understanding of the impact of O3 on plants, it is still difficult to detect response patterns at the leaf level.
  • Here, we employed principal component analysis (PCA) to analyse a database containing physiological leaf-level parameters of 60-yr-old Fagus sylvatica (European beech) trees. Data were collected over two climatically contrasting years under ambient and twice-ambient O3 regimes in a free-air forest environment.
  • The first principal component (PC1) of the PCA was consistently responsive to O3 and crown position within the trees over both years. Only a few of the original parameters showed an O3 effect. PC1 was related to parameters indicative of oxidative stress signalling and changes in carbohydrate metabolism. PC1 correlated with cumulative O3 uptake over preceding days.
  • PC1 represents an O3-responsive multivariate pattern detectable in the absence of consistently measurable O3 effects on individual leaf-level parameters. An underlying effect of O3 on physiological processes is indicated, providing experimental confirmation of theoretical O3 response patterns suggested previously.

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